HOW LACK OF SLEEP EFFECTS WEIGHT GAIN

We know from studies that lack of sleep is causally connected to many physical problems. One of the common symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea is being overweight. So then, how do sleep disorders contribute to weight gain?
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 Ghrelin: the Hunger Hormone
Lack of sleep increases ghrelin, and decreases leptin, both effects producing increased hunger and obesity. Leptin is the “anti-hunger” hormone. When the circadian rhythm is interrupted by exposure to light at night, gherlin is released.
Ghrelin is known as the “hunger hormone” It is produced in the gastrointestinal tract  and functions as a neurotransmitter. The receptor for ghrelin is found on the same cells in the brain as the receptor for leptin, the satiety hormone that has opposite effects from ghrelin.
 
An inverse relationship between the hours of sleep and blood concentrations of ghrelin exists; as the hours of sleep increase, ghrelin levels trend lower and obesity is less likely.  Short sleep duration is associated with high levels of ghrelin and obesity.
When the stomach is empty, ghrelin is secreted. When we eat something the stomach is stretched and ghrelin secretion stops. Ghrelin acts to increase hunger and to increase gastric acid secretion and gastrointestinal motility to prepare the body for food intake.
What else does Ghrelin effect?
Beyond regulating hunger, ghrelin also plays a significant role in other systemic functions. Ghrelin influences body composition, it stimulates the release of growth hormone and regulaties the distribution and rate of use of energy.
Conclusion
This is just another convincing reason to get adequate healthy sleep. Light is the circadian rhythm disrupter. Avoid light disturbances during sleep: have no lights in the bed room, pull the shades down to block any outside light, wear an eye mask.
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Resources
WebMD
Wikipedia
Zarouna SWozniak G, Papachristou
  • Stalo Zarouna, Psychology Department, University of Cyprus, Nicosia 1678, Cyprus.
  • Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology, University of Cordoba, Instituto Maimónides de Investigación Biomédica de Córdoba (IMIBIC), and CIBER Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición, 14004 Córdoba, Spain.

Are You Overweight? Calculate Your BMI – The Critical Measurement of Health

The Body Mass Index (BMI) appraisal is the most widely used tool to measure healthy body weight. This ratio of height to weight will help assess whether you are underweight, normal weight or overweight.

 The higher the BMI, the greater the risk of some diseases, including:
Sleep Apnea
Stroke
High blood pressure
Coronary artery disease
Osteoarthritis
Some cancers
Diabetes type 2
 
Sleep Apnea awareness is “contagious”. As more and more people learn about SA, doctors are driven to get training and certification to be able to discover and treat this disease. Less than 1 % of doctors are trained in Sleep Medicine to help the 40 million people afflicted with SA.
 
Here is a BMI calculator, from the Mayo Clinic, that you can use to determine your (or a child’s) BMI. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/bmi-calculator/NU00597
 
Take the assessment, then rate yourself (below).
 
Category BMI range – kg/m2 BMI Prime
Very severely underweight less than 15 less than 0.60
Severely underweight from 15.0 to 16.0 from 0.60 to 0.64
Underweight from 16.0 to 18.5 from 0.64 to 0.74
Normal (healthy weight) from 18.5 to 25 from 0.74 to 1.0
Overweight from 25 to 30 from 1.0 to 1.2
Obese Class I (Moderately obese) from 30 to 35 from 1.2 to 1.4
Obese Class II (Severely obese) from 35 to 40 from 1.4 to 1.6
Obese Class III (Very severely obese) over 40 over 1.6