LEARN DENTAL SLEEP MEDICINE in Louisville, KY on JULY 22,23

 3-3-13 EINSTEIN- DISCOVERY

Dr. George Jones will explain the WHY and the HOW of these Obstructive Sleep Apnea connections:

  • WHY is High Blood Pressure a symptom of SA?
  • WHY is Acid Reflux (GERD) a symptom of SA?
  • WHY is Diabetes a symptom of SA?

Learn the risk factors and HOW they contribute to OSA:

  • Excess weight. Fat deposits around your upper airway may obstruct your breathing. However, not everyone who has sleep apnea is overweight. Thin people develop OSA, too.
  • A narrowed airway. You may have inherited a naturally narrow throat. Or, your tonsils or adenoids may become enlarged, which can block your airway. An enlarged or inflamed uvula will block the airway.
    Being male. Men are twice as likely to have sleep apnea. However, women increase their risk if they’re overweight, and their risk also appears to rise after menopause.
  • Age. Sleep apnea occurs much more often in adults over 60.
  • Family history. If you have family members with sleep apnea, you may be at increased risk.
  • Race. In people under 35 years old, blacks are more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea.
  • Use of alcohol, sedatives or tranquilizers. These substances relax the muscles in your throat.
  • Smoking. Smokers are three times more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea than are people who’ve never smoked. Smoking may increase the amount of inflammation and fluid retention in the upper airway. This risk likely drops after you quit smoking.
  • Nasal congestion. If you have difficulty breathing through your nose — whether it’s from an anatomical problem or allergies — you’re more likely to develop obstructive sleep apnea.
  • Neck circumference. People with a thicker neck may have a narrower airway.
https://adental.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/1-30-14-girl-w-tapes-on-neck.jpg
Earn 16 CE credits and become The Sleep Dentist.
Brand yourself as a Doctor who understands, discovers, treats sleep  problems.
Read more about this.  www.TheSleepMagazine.com

 

https://adental.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/1-21-13-logo-dental-pros-sharing.jpg

See the two day course outline and register here: http://join.sleepgroupsolutions.com/seminars/louisville-ky/

George-Jones_2016

Dr. George Jones
Dr. George Jones is a native of Wheeling, WV and earned his BS in Chemistry from Wheeling Jesuit University. He received his Dental Degree from the University Of Florida College Of Dentistry, and relocated to coastal North Carolina in 2003. Over the years, Dr. Jones has served as a consultant and evaluator for several dental manufacturers and maintains a private practice in Sunset Beach, NC. .

WHAT ARE THE RISK FACTORS OF OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA?

Learn Dental Sleep Medicine in Louisville, KY on  July 22-23.

 

 3-3-13 EINSTEIN- DISCOVERY

Dr. George Jones will explain the WHY and the HOW of these Obstructive Sleep Apnea connections:

  • WHY is High Blood Pressure a symptom of SA?
  • WHY is Acid Reflux (GERD) a symptom of SA?
  • WHY is Diabetes a symptom of SA?

Learn the risk factors and HOW they contribute to OSA:

  • Excess weight. Fat deposits around your upper airway may obstruct your breathing. However, not everyone who has sleep apnea is overweight. Thin people develop OSA, too.
  • Neck circumference. People with thicker necks may have narrower airways. Women- greater than 15″ diameter and men-17″ diameter are at greater risk.
  • A narrowed airway. You may have inherited a naturally narrow throat. Or, your tonsils or adenoids may become enlarged, which can block your airway. An enlarged or inflamed uvula will block the airway.
    Being male. Men are twice as likely to have sleep apnea. However, women increase their risk if they’re overweight, and their risk also appears to rise after menopause.
  • Age. Sleep apnea occurs significantly more often in adults over 60.
  • Family history. If you have family members with sleep apnea, you may be at increased risk.
  • Race. In people under 35 years old, blacks are more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea.
  • Use of alcohol, sedatives or tranquilizers. These substances relax the muscles in your throat.
  • Smoking. Smokers are three times more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea than are people who’ve never smoked. Smoking may increase the amount of inflammation and fluid retention in the upper airway. This risk likely drops after you quit smoking.
  • Nasal congestion. If you have difficulty breathing through your nose — whether it’s from an anatomical problem or allergies — you’re more likely to develop obstructive sleep apnea.
https://adental.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/1-30-14-girl-w-tapes-on-neck.jpg
Earn 16 CE credits and become The Sleep Dentist.
Brand yourself as a Doctor who understands, discovers, treats sleep  problems.
Read more about this.  www.TheSleepMagazine.com

 

https://adental.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/1-21-13-logo-dental-pros-sharing.jpg

See the Two day course outline and register here: http://join.sleepgroupsolutions.com/seminars/louisville-ky/

http://sleepgroupsolutions.com/2.0/speakers/73/dr-george-jones

Dr. George Jones is a native of Wheeling, WV and earned his BS in Chemistry from Wheeling Jesuit University. He received his Dental Degree from the University Of Florida College Of Dentistry, and relocated to coastal North Carolina in 2003. Over the years, Dr. Jones has served as a consultant and evaluator for several dental manufacturers and maintains a private practice in Sunset Beach, NC. .

 

Does your New Patient Exam include a Sleep Apnea screening?

 7-14-12 MAN SLEEPING

Patients are realizing that snoring is a warning sign of a more serious condition. A blockage of oxygen to the brain, caused by apnoeic events, can influence systemic damage.
-Sleep Apnea is connected to strokes, cardiac arrest, diabetes, dementia and motor vehicle accidents.
-The public asks their dentists for help- most dentists are unprepared. -Less than 5% of practicing dentists are trained and qualified to screen and treat the over 40 million victims of Sleep Apnea.
-One of the next three patients that walk thru your doors suffers from a sleep disorder.
Are you prepared to help them?
Are you providing a truly comprehensive exam?
8-2-14 MATH FOR DUMMIEsS 8
On December 4th and 5th in Tampa, Fla.,  Dr. Barry Freydberg will show how to incorporate Dental Sleep Medicine into a dental practice. He has a unique perspective on DSM and will share ideas from his own successful dental practice, including medical Insurance billing- Codes, Fees and Procedures.
Learn with 16 CE credits and have a hands-on experience with the diagnostic materials and equipment.
Date :   Friday and Saturday, Dec. 4th and 5th 
Time:    8 AM to 5 PM
Venue: Tampa Hilton Hotel.  
After enjoying the Dental Sleep Medicine seminar, you can take advantage of Tampa’s excellent recreational activities and dining options.https://adental.files.wordpress.com/2014/04/4-23-14-sclar.jpg

Review the course outline and register here:

December
12/04/2015 – 12/05/2015
TAMPA, FL TAMPA, FL 

Hilton Tampa Airport Westshore

Dr. Barry Freydberg, a 1968 graduate of the University Of Illinois College Of Dentistry was a full-time practicing general dentist, until recently, where he now spends most of his chair-side time practicing dental sleep medicine in Illinois and Arizona. He says, “In my senior practice years, sleep medicine is fascinating, physically much easier than general dentistry and more rewarding.”

Dr. Freydberg was named University of Illinois “Alumni of the Year” in 2004. He is a Fellow of the Academy of General Dentistry, a Fellow of the International College of Dentists, a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and a Fellow of the International Academy for Dental-Facial Esthetics. He is a leading speaker on conservative “Prepless” esthetic dentistry and is considered a pioneer in raising dentists’ awareness of the ever-growing link between high technology and practice and clinical management.

Scary connection: Sleep Apnea and Acid Reflux

10-28-14 GHOST 1

How it happens:
During the cessations of breathing the body will increase its efforts to take in air.
Abdominal contractions are exaggerated and increase until breathing resumes.
The contractions squeeze the stomach and force acid up the esophagus.
The efforts to breathe also increase a negative pressure in the esophagus which also
 pull up acid.

Become a Sleep Medicine Dentist and help your patients that have these Sleep Apnea connected comorbidities and symptoms-
Diabetes, High Blood Pressure, GERD, headaches, nocturnal bruxism.

Explanations like this are presented in upcoming Sleep Apnea seminars.
You can view the course outlines and register here:

Oct 2015

ATLANTA, GA –           10/16/2015 – 10/17/2015 Register Now! 
LOS ANGELES, CA – 10/16/2015 – 10/17/2015 Register Now! 
SEATTLE, WA –         10/23/2015 – 10/24/2015 Register Now! 

Nov 2015

PHILADELPHIA, PA –   11/06/2015 – 11/07/2015 Register Now! 
SALT LAKE CITY, UT – 11/06/2015 – 11/07/2015 Register Now! 
IRVINE, CA –                 11/13/2015 – 11/14/2015 Register Now! 
OKLAHOMA CITY, OK –11/13/2015 – 11/14/2015 Register Now! 
LAS VEGAS, NV –          11/20/2015 – 11/21/2015 Register Now! 
MEMPHIS, TN –              11/20/2015 – 11/21/2015 Register Now! 

Scary connection between Sleep Apnea and Acid Reflux

10-28-14 GHOST 1

Most Sleep Apnea sufferers have Acid Reflux…. and other comorbidities.

How it happens:
During the cessations of breathing the body will increase its efforts to take in air.
Abdominal contractions are exaggerated and increase until breathing resumes.
The contractions squeeze the stomach and force acid up the esophagus.
The efforts to breathe also increase a negative pressure in the esophagus which also pull up acid.

Become a Sleep Medicine Dentist and help your patients that have these Sleep Apnea connected comorbidities and symptoms-
Diabetes, High Blood Pressure, GERD, headaches, nocturnal bruxism.

Explanations like this are presented in the upcoming Sleep Apnea seminars.
You can view the course outlines and register here:

Oct 2015

ATLANTA, GA –           10/16/2015 – 10/17/2015 Register Now! 
LOS ANGELES, CA – 10/16/2015 – 10/17/2015 Register Now! 
SEATTLE, WA –         10/23/2015 – 10/24/2015 Register Now! 

Nov 2015

PHILADELPHIA, PA –   11/06/2015 – 11/07/2015 Register Now! 
SALT LAKE CITY, UT – 11/06/2015 – 11/07/2015 Register Now! 
IRVINE, CA –                 11/13/2015 – 11/14/2015 Register Now! 
OKLAHOMA CITY, OK –11/13/2015 – 11/14/2015 Register Now! 
LAS VEGAS, NV –          11/20/2015 – 11/21/2015 Register Now! 
MEMPHIS, TN –              11/20/2015 – 11/21/2015 Register Now! 

 

SLEEEP SOUNDLY this fall- don’t sleep WITH SOUND.

8-3-14 SAW WOOD  

 In denial, many people still ask, “What’s the big deal about snoring?” “Don’t most people snore?”

Snoring is disturbing and is a major cause of spousal alienation. Who can sleep with the sounds of a freight train two feet away from their ear? Spouses of snorers often have to move into separate bed rooms and sales are up of homes with two Master bed rooms. Snoring is, however, the most attention demanding WARNING SIGN of serious sleep dysfunction. 

It is the common denominator in the Sleep Apnea equation. Snoring, like pain, should sound an alert to us that there is something more serious to look for under the surface.

We continue to learn about more illnesses connected to Sleep Apnea–

Cancer

Researchers suggested a correlation between sleep apnea and increased cancer risk of any kind. A Cancer study of 1,240 participants who underwent colonoscopies found that those who slept fewer than six hours a night had a 50 percent spike in risk of colorectal adenomas, which can turn malignant over time. Another 2012 study identified a possible link between sleep and aggressive breast cancers. (Ref: 2010 American Cancer Society) 

Other serious ailments known to be tied to Sleep Apnea are:    Heart Disease. Strokes, Dementia, Depression, Diabetes Mellitus, High Blood Pressure, Chronic Daytime Fatigue, Motor Vehicle Accidents

With an assortment of health threats like these, all Sleep Apnea related, we need to show more respect to snoring.

3-24-14 SNORING

The word equinox means “equal night”; night and day are about the same length of time. This occurs two times each year: Vernal in late March and Autumnal in late September.

ARE YOU GETTING TOO MUCH SLEEP?

HOW MUCH SLEEP DO YOU REALLY NEED?
Have we been misled all these years being told that we need eight hours of sleep? Don’t you feel a little more alert and cognitive after getting seven hours of sleep?  And don’t you feel somewhat groggy the next day if you’ve had nine hours or more sleep?
Sleep scientists say that skimping on a “full night’s sleep”, even by 20 minutes, impairs an adult’s performance and memory the next day. And getting too much sleep—not just too little of it—is associated with health problems including diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease and with higher rates of death, studies show.  Getting the right amount of sleep is important in being alert the next day, and several recent studies have found an association between getting seven hours of sleep and optimal cognitive performance.
7-1-15  2 DOGS SLEEP
 If we reach the ripe old age of 100 years we will have spent one third of our life, or a total of 584,000 hours* sleeping. If you are 50 years old you would have on average been asleep for 16 years and 4 months*. Rip van Winkle did it all in one stretch but have you matched his feat?  ( *Excluding the additional days in leap years)
Do you want to get back some of that lost time? You can! Evidence-based studies of large samples show that, for an adult, the optimum sleep time is 7.2 hours. Your personal make-up may make you an exception but for most people 7.2 hours of healthy sleep will be the right amount.
7-1-15 snoopy asleep
Research Revelations
“The lowest mortality and morbidity is with seven hours,” said Shawn Youngstedt, a professor in the College of Nursing and Health Innovation at Arizona State University Phoenix. “Eight hours or more has consistently been shown to be hazardous,” says Dr. Youngstedt, who researches the effects of oversleeping.
Daniel F. Kripke, an emeritus professor of psychiatry at the University of California San Diego, tracked over a six-year period data on 1.1 million people who participated in a large cancer study. People who reported they slept 6.5 to 7.4 hours had a lower mortality rate than those with shorter or longer sleep. The study, published in the Archives of General Psychiatry in 2002, controlled for 32 health factors, including medications.
In another study, published in the journal Sleep Medicine in 2011, Dr. Kripke found further evidence that the optimal amount of sleep might be less than the traditional eight hours. The researchers recorded the sleep activity of about 450 elderly women using devices on their wrist for a week. Some 10 years later the researchers found that those who slept fewer than five hours or more than 6.5 hours had a higher mortality.
study in the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience last year used data from users of the cognitive-training web site Lumosity. Researchers looked at the self-reported sleeping habits of about 160,000 users who took spatial-memory and matching tests and about 127,000 users who took an arithmetic test. They found that cognitive performance increased as people got more sleep, reaching a peak at seven hours before starting to decline.
After seven hours, “increasing sleep was not any more beneficial,” said Murali Doraiswamy, a professor of psychiatry at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., who co-authored the study with scientists from Lumos Labs Inc., which owns Lumosity. He said the study replicated earlier research, including a look at memory loss. “If you think about all the causes of memory loss, sleep is probably one of the most easily modifiable factors,” he said.
study in the current issue of Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine seemed to confirm that “you can’t overdose on healthy sleep. When you get enough sleep your body will wake you up”. Five healthy adults were placed in what the researchers called Stone Age-like conditions in Germany for more than two months—without electricity, clocks or running water. Participants fell asleep about two hours earlier and got on average 1.5 hours more sleep than was estimated in their normal lives, the study said.
Their average amount of sleep per night: 7.2 hours.
3-14-15 SHR
Conclusions
Experts say people should be able to figure out their optimal amount of sleep in a trial of three days to a week, ideally while on vacation. Don’t use an alarm clock. Go to sleep when you get tired. Avoid too much caffeine or alcohol. And stay off electronic devices a couple of hours before going to bed. During the trial, track your sleep with a diary or a device that records your actual sleep time. If you feel refreshed and awake during the day, you’ve probably discovered your optimal sleep time. You may need less sleep than you thought.

DIAGNOSING OSA IN WOMEN: The differences

SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS IN DIAGNOSING OSA FOR WOMEN
According to an article in the European Respiratory Journal, “Obstructive sleep apnea occurs in 50% of females aged 20-70 years. 20% of females have moderate and 6% severe sleep apnea.” 
Swedish scientist Dr. Karl Franklin and his team set out to find out how prevalent sleep apnea is among women and how often symptoms occur. Out of a population-based random sample of 10,000 women between the ages of 20 and 70 years, they gathered data on 400 of them. The test group were given questionnaires which included several questions regarding their sleeping habits and sleep quality. They also underwent overnight polysomnography.

WOMEN ARE LESS LIKELY TO BE DIAGNOSED FOR SLEEP APNEA

Women with sleep apnea are less likely to be diagnosed compared to men. In studies of patients registering for evaluation for sleep apnea, the ratio of men to women has sometimes been extremely lopsided, with 8 or 9 men diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) for each woman found to have (OSA). However, we know from studies in the general population that the actual ratio is likely to be closer to 2 or 3 men with OSA for each woman who has the condition.

Women make up about 45 percent of sleep study referrals and most sleep studies are still done to screen for sleep apnea.

WHY ARE WOMEN LESS LIKELY TO BE DIAGNOSED FOR SLEEP APNEA?

First, there is an unfortunate predefined notion of the make-up of a sleep apnea patient. The stereotype is a middle-age, overweight or obese male. Physicians may not be thinking of this OSA diagnosis when the patient is female. Second, women may present with slightly different symptoms than the “classic” symptoms of snoring, witnessed breathing pauses at night and excessive sleepiness during the day.

Instead, women may present with fatigue, insomnia, disrupted sleep, chronic fatigue and depression morning headaches, mood disturbances or other symptoms that may suggest reasons other than OSA for their symptoms. Because these symptoms are not specific for OSA, women may be misdiagnosed and are less likely to be referred to a sleep study for further evaluation. Another problem is that women with sleep apnea have more subtle breathing disturbances and are more likely to have REM-related apneas, so they may be tougher to diagnose.

WOMAN SNORING 5-25-15

SOME DIFFERENCES IN SYMPTOMS BETWEEN MEN AND WOMEN

Sleep apnea in females is related to age, obesity and hypertension but not to daytime sleepiness. 

The “classic” symptoms of OSA are snoring, witnessed apneas and daytime sleepiness, but women may not experience these things. Weight gain, depression, waking up gasping for breath, hypertension, and dry throat in the morning may be tip-offs for women that they may need an evaluation.

Women who are obese, pregnant women, and post-menopausal women all have a greater risk for OSA. Finally, women with the endocrine disorder, polycystic ovary syndrome, are more likely to have sleep apnea even after controlling for weight and should seek clinical evaluation.

THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN OSA AND HYPERTENSION IN WOMEN AND MEN

Obstructive sleep apnea is a significant risk factor for heart disease . The prevalence of hypertension in people with sleep apnea ranges between 30-70 percent and is similar in men and women. However, when taking body mass index (BMI) into consideration, some gender differences emerge: men with OSA who are markedly obese (BMI > 37) have a two-fold higher risk of hypertension than obese women with OSA.

THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN OSA AND DIABETES IN WOMEN AND MEN

Women with OSA tend to be more obese and have lower AHI  than males; however, studies have also suggested that women may have a higher mortality.   OSA is associated with an increased risk for the development of type 2 diabetes independent of obesity.

Women who are obese, pregnant women, and post-menopausal women all have a greater risk for OSA. Finally, women with the endocrine disorder, polycystic ovary syndrome, are more likely to have sleep apnea even after controlling for weight and should seek clinical evaluation.

COMMON SLEEP APNEA MISDIAGNOSES

Women are often diagnosed in error with one of the following conditions, rather than sleep apnea.

  • Anemia
  • Cardiac or pulmonary illnesses
  • Depression
  • Diabetes
  • Fatigue from overwork
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Hypertension
  • Hypochondria
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Insomnia
  • Menopausal changes
  • Obesity
  • Sources
  • Dr. Karl Franklin, European Respiratory Journal
  • Grace W. Pien MD, MS, assistant professor of medicine, divisions of Sleep Medicine and Pulmonary and Critical Care at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.
  • Nancy A. Collop , MD, medical director at Johns Hopkins Hospital Sleep Disorders Center and associate professor of medicine at Hopkins’ Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine in Baltimore, Md .
  • Fiona C. Baker, PhD, sleep physiologist, Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, in Menlo Park, Calif.
  • Anita L. Blosser, MD, with Duke Primary Care at the Henderson Family Medicine Clinic in Henderson, N.C.

Scary that most Sleep Apnea victims have Acid Reflux…. and other comorbidities.

10-28-14 GHOST 1

The Causes:
During the cessations of breathing the body will increase its efforts to take in air.
Abdominal contractions are exaggerated and increase until breathing resumes.
The contractions squeeze the stomach and force acid up the esophagus.
The efforts to breathe also increase a negative pressure in the esophagus which also pull up acid.

Become a Sleep Medicine Dentist and help your patients that have these Sleep Apnea connected comorbidities and symptoms-
Diabetes, High Blood Pressure GERD, headaches, nocturnal bruxism.

Explanations like this are presented in the upcoming Sleep Apnea seminars:
Oklahoma City    Dr.Damian Blum
Atlanta                 Dr. Marty Lipsey
Hollywood, FL     Dr. Dan Tache’
Boston                
Dr Barry Freydberg
Indianapolis        Dr. George Jones
Orlando               Dr Anjoo Ely
Miami                 
Dr Barry Freydberg
Houston              
Dr.Damian Blum
Scottsdale           Dr. Marty Lipsey

You can view the dates and course outlines and register here:
http://sleepgroupsolutions.com/2.0/modules/piCal/index.php?smode=&op=&cid=2

6-16-12 BUTTON #2

Autumn Starts September 21st- Sleep Well!

Sleep soundly this fall- don’t sleep with sound.

8-3-14 SAW WOODIn denial, many people still ask, “What’s the big deal about snoring?” “Don’t most people snore?”

Snoring is disturbing and is a major cause of spousal alienation. Who can sleep with the sounds of a freight train two feet away from their ear? Spouses of snorers often have to move into separate bed rooms and sales are up of homes with two Master bed rooms.Snoring is, however, the most attention demanding WARNING SIGN of serious sleep dysfunction. 

It is the common denominator in the Sleep Apnea equation. Snoring, like pain, should sound an alert to us that there is something more serious to look for under the surface.

We continue to learn about more illnesses connected to Sleep Apnea

Cancer

Researchers suggested a correlation between sleep apnea and increased cancer risk of any kind. A Cancer study of 1,240 participants who underwent colonoscopies found that those who slept fewer than six hours a night had a 50 percent spike in risk of colorectal adenomas, which can turn malignant over time. Another 2012 study identified a possible link between sleep and aggressive breast cancers. Ref: 2010 American Cancer Society Other serious ailments known to be tied to Sleep Apnea are:

Obesity, Dementia, Depression, Diabetes Mellitus, High Blood Pressure, Chronic Daytime Fatigue, Motor Vehicle Accidents

With an assortment of health threats like these, all Sleep Apnea related, we need to show more respect to snoring.

3-24-14 SNORING

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