DO WE HAVE TOO MANY DENTAL HYGIENISTS?

A Hygienist/Staffing Specialist in Cleveland/Akron, Ohio posed this question on LinkedIn to the American Dental Education Association:   “…why are schools graduating so many Dental Hygienists in a field that is very saturated, with little chance of job opportunities for these new Dental Hygiene grads? “

I am also interested in hearing the answer. Here in south Florida there is a plethora of well trained, dedicated Hygienists who are working part-time for Staffing Agencies, or as clinical assistants, and in other industries, because there are not enough opportunities in dental offices. My colleagues in Philadelphia and southern California tell me the situation is similar there.

Do you find this to be the case in YOUR area?

From The Bureau of Labor Statistics:
Job prospects are expected to be favorable in most areas, but will vary by geographical location. Because graduates are permitted to practice only in the State in which they are licensed, hygienists wishing to practice in areas that have an abundance of dental hygiene programs may experience strong competition for jobs.

Projection data from the National Employment Matrix Occupation:
Dental hygienists

174,100 2008
237,000 2018
36% increase

Do you feel that expanding the legal functions of Hygienists, and relaxing their areas of “direct supervision” will alleviate this problem?

CELEBRATE ISRAEL INDEPENDENCE DAY IN SOUTH FLORIDA.

IAC MAY 3

Yom Ha’atzmaut is celebrated on the 5th day of Iyar (ה’ באייר) in the Hebrew calendar, the anniversary of the day in which Israel independence was proclaimed, when David Ben-Gurion publicly read the Israeli Declaration of Independence. The corresponding Gregorian date was 14 May 1948.

In 2015 the Gregorian date for Yom Ha’atzmaut is 23 April 2015, advanced one day to Iyar 4  

This Florida celebration is on Sunday, May 3, 2015

A BIG STEP FOR SLEEP HEALTH IN FLORIDA

Dental Sleep Medicine is making progress in all directions. If all OSA professsionals would be less competitive and more cooperative we could make greater strides to help the 40 million sleep deprived victims.

LIP 8

This past weekend in Florida Sleep Group Solutions showed how DSM masters from all over our country could come together to brainstorm for the benefit of the profession and the health of the public.

1-31-15 SGS AT POOL AHere, at SGS headquarters,  the Dental Sleep Medicine award winners are posing for a photo after the masterminding sessions.

Wish you were there.

1-21-13 LOGO DENTAL PROS SHARING

Scary that most Sleep Apnea victims have Acid Reflux…. and other comorbidities.

10-28-14 GHOST 1

The Causes:
During the cessations of breathing the body will increase its efforts to take in air.
Abdominal contractions are exaggerated and increase until breathing resumes.
The contractions squeeze the stomach and force acid up the esophagus.
The efforts to breathe also increase a negative pressure in the esophagus which also pull up acid.

Become a Sleep Medicine Dentist and help your patients that have these Sleep Apnea connected comorbidities and symptoms-
Diabetes, High Blood Pressure GERD, headaches, nocturnal bruxism.

Explanations like this are presented in the upcoming Sleep Apnea seminars:
Oklahoma City    Dr.Damian Blum
Atlanta                 Dr. Marty Lipsey
Hollywood, FL     Dr. Dan Tache’
Boston                
Dr Barry Freydberg
Indianapolis        Dr. George Jones
Orlando               Dr Anjoo Ely
Miami                 
Dr Barry Freydberg
Houston              
Dr.Damian Blum
Scottsdale           Dr. Marty Lipsey

You can view the dates and course outlines and register here:
http://sleepgroupsolutions.com/2.0/modules/piCal/index.php?smode=&op=&cid=2

6-16-12 BUTTON #2

Take the “Most Interesting Man in the Medical Billing World” poll

7-22-14 STAY THIRSTY. Dr. L. is

BUFFALO- Are you able to help these patients?

Does your New Patient Exam include a screening for Sleep Apnea? 
It is reported that 34% of the population has SA symptoms. Of the next three patients 
that walk thru your doors, one is a Sleep Apnea victim.  Are you able to help them?
1-29-13  SNORING
In a 2 day seminar Dr. Marty Lipsey presents a Dental Sleep protocol A to Z, 
                                    including his unique systems on 
                  Medical Insurance billing- Codes, Fees and Procedures.

                     Friday and Saturday, July 25 and 26 in Buffalo, NY
7-18-14 BUFFALO NITE SKY Dentists are in the first line of discovery and defense of many systemic diseases. 
We are often the first ones to discover diabetes, oral cancer, SLEEP APNEA. 
The three serious conditions listed above are all too frequently under-diagnosed. 
New tools and techniques are now available for dental professionals to be able to 
do far more as comprehensive caregivers for their patients. 
Sleep Apnea Screening
--Patients are realizing how a blockage of oxygen to the brain, caused by 
nocturnal apnoeic events, can influence systemic damage. 
-Sleep Apnea is connected to strokes, cardiac arrest, diabetes, dementia and 
motor vehicle accidents. 
-The public asks their dentists for help and most dentists are unprepared. 
- Less than 1% of practicing dentists are trained and qualified to screen and treat 
the over 40 million victims of Sleep Apnea.
                                     -Are you prepared to help them? 

LIP 5In a 2 day seminar Dr. Lipsey will train you in Dental Sleep Medicine with 16 CE credits. 
                   Friday and Saturday, July 25 and 26 in Buffalo, NY


Review the course outline and register here:
http://sleepgroupsolutions.com/2.0/modules/piCal/index.php?smode=
Daily&action=View&event_id=0000004261&caldate=2014-7-18 Dr. Marty Lipsey Dr. Marty Lipsey, received his DDS degree from UCLA and a Master of Science 
from Northwestern University Dental School. Dr. Lipsey is the founder of 
Dental Sleep Med Systems, offering dental teams assistance in implementing and 
improving dental sleep medicine practices, including electronic medical billing 
and successful insurance coding and processing. Dr. Lipsey is also a 
Sleep Group Solutions Instructor, and teaches Dental Sleep Medicine regularly.
                  Are you providing a Comprehensive Exam?
11-26-13 DOS EQUOS

Is it ADHD, or does your child have Sleep Apnea?

A thoughtful question posed by a doctor at The Pennsylvania Snoring and Sleep Institute. Many of the symptoms are similar and the two illnesses are often confused.

“Not much is understood by parents about snoring or sleep apnea, especially in their children. The Stanford School of Medicine states that about 10% of children 10 years of age and younger snore and, of those children who snore, about 20% will have obstructive sleep apnea.
Snoring can be a sign that your child has sleep apnea as it indicates, at the very least, that their airway is partially obstructed during sleep. Sleep apnea is a serious medical condition that can interrupt or stop your child’s breathing, prevent a normal night’s sleep, impair growth, and lead to a lower quality of life. It also can cause serious fatigue during the day which is why it is so often confused with ADHD.
Sleep-disordered breathing such as snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have long been associated with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder). You should know that not every child diagnosed with sleep apnea has ADHD, just as not every child diagnosed with ADHD has sleep apnea. However, many studies have been performed indicating a significant correlation between OSA and behavioral issues. Children with obstructive sleep apnea do not get restful sleep, and as a result may complain of morning headaches, be irritable and have difficulty concentrating.
Children with sleep apnea may complain of being tired during the day and, at the same time, exhibit hyperactive behavior or act impulsively. Herein lays the confusion of separating sleep apnea from ADHD because many of the classic symptoms of ADHD are often exhibited in children with OSA. So, as a parent of a child diagnosed with ADHD, what do you do?”

5-7-14 adhd“It will be in your child’s best interest if you dig a little deeper into the root of what may be causing these behaviors. Watch your child sleep at night – and even record it if you can. Check for restlessness, mouth breathing, snoring, or breathing pauses. If they occur, have your child evaluated for possible sleep apnea to ensure the proper diagnosis and treatment.
Figuring out if your child has sleep apnea or ADHD may seem quite complex but it doesn’t have to be. Consult with a sleep apnea doctor if you can answer ‘yes’ to any or some of the following questions:
– Does your child snore?
– Does your child stop breathing for a few seconds at night?
– Does your child frequently mouth breathe?
– Does your child sleep through the night or is it a restless sleep?
– Is there frequent bedwetting?
– Does your child seem irritable during the day? Is there difficulty focusing? Are there periods of hyperactivity?”

7-14-1`2 teacher and sleeper“The good news is that sleep apnea is treatable. Enlarged tonsils and adenoids are the most common causes of sleep apnea in children. An Ear, Nose and Throat specialist can determine if your child’s tonsils and adenoids are enlarged and possibly blocking the airway at night. A tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy can successfully treat sleep apnea by removing the obstruction in the airway resulting in a complete elimination of symptoms in 80-90% of children.”

Dr. Lana B. Patitucci, D.O. is a Board Certified Otolaryngologist at The Pennsylvania Snoring and Sleep Institute. She is trained in all aspects of general and pediatric otolaryngology including endoscopic sinus, otologic, head and neck, and facial plastic surgery.

Not much is understood by parents about snoring or sleep apnea, especially in their children. (istockphoto.com)
Not much is understood by parents about snoring or sleep apnea, especially in their children. (istockphoto.com) iStockphoto

 

Not much is understood by parents about snoring or sleep apnea, especially in their children. The Stanford School of Medicine states that about 10% of children 10 years of age and younger snore and, of those children who snore, about 20% will have obstructive sleep apnea.

Snoring can be a sign that your child has sleep apnea as it indicates, at the very least, that their airway is partially obstructed during sleep. Sleep apnea is a serious medical condition that can interrupt or stop your child’s breathing, prevent a normal night’s sleep, impair growth, and lead to a lower quality of life. It also can cause serious fatigue during the day which is why it is so often confused with ADHD.

Sleep-disordered breathing such as snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have long been associated with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder). You should know that not every child diagnosed with sleep apnea has ADHD, just as not every child diagnosed with ADHD has sleep apnea. However, many studies have been performed indicating a significant correlation between OSA and behavioral issues. Children with obstructive sleep apnea do not get restful sleep, and as a result may complain of morning headaches, be irritable and have difficulty concentrating.

Children with sleep apnea may complain of being tired during the day and, at the same time, exhibit hyperactive behavior or act impulsively. Herein lays the confusion of separating sleep apnea from ADHD because many of the classic symptoms of ADHD are often exhibited in children with OSA. So, as a parent of a child diagnosed with ADHD, what do you do?

More coverage

It will be in your child’s best interest if you dig a little deeper into the root of what may be causing these behaviors. Watch your child sleep at night – and even record it if you can. Check for restlessness, mouth breathing, snoring, or breathing pauses. If they occur, have your child evaluated for possible sleep apnea to ensure the proper diagnosis and treatment.

Figuring out if your child has sleep apnea or ADHD may seem quite complex but it doesn’t have to be. Consult with a sleep apnea doctor if you can answer ‘yes’ to any or some of the following questions:

– Does your child snore?
– Does your child stop breathing for a few seconds at night?
– Does your child frequently mouth breathe?
– Does your child sleep through the night or is it a restless sleep?
– Is there frequent bedwetting?
– Does your child seem irritable during the day? Is there difficulty focusing? Are there periods of hyperactivity?

The good news is that sleep apnea is treatable. Enlarged tonsils and adenoids are the most common causes of sleep apnea in children. An Ear, Nose and Throat specialist can determine if your child’s tonsils and adenoids are enlarged and possibly blocking the airway at night. A tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy can successfully treat sleep apnea by removing the obstruction in the airway resulting in a complete elimination of symptoms in 80-90% of children.


Dr. Lana B. Patitucci, D.O. is a Board Certified Otolaryngologist at The Pennsylvania Snoring and Sleep Institute. She is trained in all aspects of general and pediatric otolaryngology including endoscopic sinus, otologic, head and neck, and facial plastic surgery. Her hospital affiliations include Abington Surgical Center, Blue Bell, Chestnut Hill, Einstein Medical, Mercy Suburban, and Roxborough Memorial Hospital

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Also on Philly.com:

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/health/kidshealth/Is_it_ADHD_or_does_your_child_have_sleep_apnea.html#TYY84FfPttStbKMX.99

SIZE MATTERS- Sleep, Longevity and Telomere Length

Size matters. 
That old quip has been used, misused and abused. But when it comes to the size 
of your telomeres, nothing could be more important to you. The length of your 
telomeres can determine how long and how well you will live. 
Longevity and Quality of Life.

Telomeres are little protective caps at the ends of your chromosomes. They are 
likened to the aglets at the ends of your shoe laces, protecting your laces from 
fraying.
  5-1-14 TELOMERE 1In the journal Sleep, January issue, there are several studies relating sleep to 
telomere length (TL). 
One study shows the connection of sleep to longevity. The evidence is piling 
up that the aging process may be accelerated by not getting enough 
quality sleep.
"Telomeres are the DNA-protein structures located like caps at the ends of chromosomes. 
They shorten with aging and may also be a marker of biological, not chronological, aging. 
They are believed to be involved in protecting the chromosome  from inflammation and various 
stressors. In some studies, their diminishing length has been associated with 
diabetes and atherosclerosis."

The study demonstrated that poor sleepers, as defined by poor sleep quality or short duration 
(less than 7 hours per night), had significantly shorter telomere length. Even more interesting 
was the finding that in the older adults, adequate sleep was associated with telomere lengths 
comparable to middle-aged adults. The authors concluded that the study provides evidence that 
sleep is linked to cellular aging.
With Sleep Apnea, you are starving your body of oxygen and are being jarred closer to consciousness at least 6 times an hour. With normal regenerative sleep, you should
be enjoying a heightened anabolic (building up and restoring) state, with growth and rejuvenation of the immune, nervous, skeletal and muscular systems. The dozens of near-awakenings keep the Sleep Apnea sufferer in a vigilant and catabolic (breaking down and using up) state that should be reserved for the on-the-go, waking hours.
The telomere shortening mechanism normally limits cells to a fixed number of divisions, and animal studies suggest that this is responsible for aging on the cellular level and sets a limit on lifespans. 
We know that telomeres shorten with biological aging. We also know that they 
shorten in response to chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. In fact, even 
the telomeres of newborns exposed to physiological stressors in utero have 
been found to be shorter. We also have learned that the shortening of telomeres 
can result in increased susceptibility to tissue damage, including cancer.

 Telomeres protect chromosome ends from being mistaken for broken pieces of 
DNA that would otherwise be fixed by cellular repair .  When the telomeres get 
short enough, our cells no longer divide and our body stops making those cells. 
Over time, this leads to aging and death.
5-1-14 TELOMERE 2               Magnification of Chromosomes showing Telomeres
It is becoming increasingly obvious that not getting enough quality sleep will cause systemic destruction and may accelerate the aging process.
What is “enough quality sleep”? Stay tuned in.
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  64. “Elizabeth Blackburn calls time on ‘fountain of youth’ firm Telome Health”.



 

 

THE VALUE OF A PULSE OXIMETER IN A DENTAL EXAM

In your New Patient Exam are you missing an opportunity to discover an illness that your patient is not aware of … and that you may be able to treat?

United States’ Medical professionals have noted the increase of patients with Sleep Apnea. A recent study shows that 34% of the population have symptoms of Sleep Apnea.  Air pollution, lack of exercise and greater public awareness may contribute to this increase. In order to combat Sleep Apnea the conditions must be monitored and reported to trained, qualified doctors for evaluation.
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Pulse oximetry, along with a clinical score (Epworth Sleepiness Score, for example), is an effective screening tool for Sleep Apnea and other sleep disordered breathing. This approach, though not as accurate or comprehensive as polysomnography, is an effective screening tool.  The oximeter provides the necessary information relating to how well air is getting into the lungs,
and consequently oxygen into the blood stream.

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Fingertip pulse oximeters are very inexpensive and are available at local pharmacies and on-line.
Every dental practice can make this two minute test part of their patient exam.

How pulse oximetry works in evidencing sleep apnea is very simple. When a person has sleep apnea, s/he experiences moments when s/he does not breathe (apnea events). When this happens the oxygen that circulates in the blood drops to an abnormally low level. A pulse oximeter will detect the drop in the oxygen saturation of the blood.

Significant oxygen saturation change is defined as a drop in oxygen saturation of greater or equal to 4 percent and to a level of 90% or below. Each series of changes represents an apnea episode.


The pulse oximeter is an important part of a sleep study because it monitors the blood oxygen levels. The mechanism of the device uses infrared light that passes through the finger, or sometimes the earlobe, and measures the difference between the oxygen-bound and unbound hemoglobin. The oxygen-bound hemoglobin have the wavelength of red light, and the oxygen-unbound hemoglobin have the wavelength of blue light. The oximeter measures the difference between these two hemoglobin compositions, and the value of their difference displays whether the oxygen saturation in the blood is normal or not.

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Pulse oximeters also give readings of pulse rates. Research has shown that obstructive sleep apnea changes heart rate dynamics. During periods of prolonged obstructive sleep apnea, the heart rate typically shows cyclic fluctuation associated with the apneic phase and the resumption of breathing. By analyzing the heart rate, a study has shown that obstructive sleep apnea could be detected in over 93% of the test cases.

Sources
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17283346
http://EzineArticles.com/5828493

 

SLEEP APNEA TRAINING and MEDICAL BILLING at GLIDEWELL LAB in IRVINE, CA

Wouldn’t it be nice to get paid for an “Office Visit” like an MD?
Bill your services to your patient’s benefit company and to Medicare.
Sleep Apnea victims will not have to go untreated in YOUR office.
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   SUBJECT:         Introduction to Dental Sleep Medicine
 DATE:                   April 11th and 12th – Fri. and Sat.
LOCATION:             Irvine, CA      Glidewell  Center
PRESENTERS:    Dr. Marty Lipsey, Mr. John Nadeau
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Dr. Marty Lipsey is one of the foremost authorities on electronic medical billing and successful insurance coding and processing for Sleep Apnea services. He trains dental practices from New York to Los Angeles in Dental Sleep Medicine.

John Nadeau is Vice President of Sleep Group Solutions and has designed and presented Dental Sleep Medicine programs guiding thousands of dentists to assist Sleep Apnea victims.


Dr. Lipsey and Mr. Nadeau will guide you thru a protocol for learning Dental Sleep Medicine from A to zzzzzzz.

1-29-13  SNORINGThe course includes:

  • Patient Education,
  • Case Presentation and Treatment Acceptance,
  • Hands-on working with the popular Oral Appliances including TAP, Respire, EMA, Silent Night and others,
  • Sleep Apnea Medical Insurance Codes, Fees, Billing Procedures,
  • And much more.

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After the Seminar Dr. Lipsey will continue to Mentor you, giving you the confidence to be a Sleep Medicine Doctor.

Meet him here, read the full course outline, and register here:
http://sleepgroupsolutions.com/2.0/modules/piCal/index.php?action=View&event_id=0000003043

About Dr. Marty Lipsey :

Dr. Marty Lipsey Dr. Marty Lipsey, received his DDS degree from UCLA and a Master of Science from Northwestern University Dental School. Dr. Lipsey is the founder of Dental Sleep Med Systems, offering dental teams assistance in implementing and/or improving their dental sleep medicine practices, including electronic medical billing and successful insurance coding and processing. Dr. Lipsey is a Sleep Group Solutions Executive Instructor, and teaches Dental Sleep Medicine from coast to coast.

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