DO WE HAVE TOO MANY DENTAL HYGIENISTS?

A Hygienist/Staffing Specialist in Cleveland/Akron, Ohio posed this question on LinkedIn to the American Dental Education Association:   “…why are schools graduating so many Dental Hygienists in a field that is very saturated, with little chance of job opportunities for these new Dental Hygiene grads? “

I am also interested in hearing the answer. Here in south Florida there is a plethora of well trained, dedicated Hygienists who are working part-time for Staffing Agencies, or as clinical assistants, and in other industries, because there are not enough opportunities in dental offices. My colleagues in Philadelphia and southern California tell me the situation is similar there.

Do you find this to be the case in YOUR area?

From The Bureau of Labor Statistics:
Job prospects are expected to be favorable in most areas, but will vary by geographical location. Because graduates are permitted to practice only in the State in which they are licensed, hygienists wishing to practice in areas that have an abundance of dental hygiene programs may experience strong competition for jobs.

Projection data from the National Employment Matrix Occupation:
Dental hygienists

174,100 2008
237,000 2018
36% increase

Do you feel that expanding the legal functions of Hygienists, and relaxing their areas of “direct supervision” will alleviate this problem?

★★ Learn from the Stars ★★

Featured

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Dr. Damian Blum, a renown trainer and a star in Dental Sleep Medicine, will present a comprehensive “A to Z” introduction course to dentists and their teams in Hollywood, Florida.
https://adental.files.wordpress.com/2014/12/004.jpg
You can join the battle to combat this serious diseaseSleep Apnea..
Get trained and prepared to help the 40 million victims of sleep apnea. Many of them are already your patients.
Be a shining light and stand out as a doctor who literally saves lives.
9-11-14 UNIQUE BULB
Register with code: DBK916 and receive huge ($1130.) savings on tuition:
Only 655. with 2 auxiliaries at no charge.
(Available only by responding with this code.)
Review the course outline and register here:
 

 

ARE YOU A SMOKER?

Are you a smoker? If so, the chances are that you have obstructive sleep apnea. Smokers are three times more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) than are people who have never smoked.
The Correlation
Smoking may irritate the tissues in your nose and throat and cause inflammation and fluid retention in your upper airway. This swelling causes a blockage which restricts air flow.
Both smoking and OSA are deadly conditions that, in combination, will wreak havoc to your quality of life and can severely shorten your life span.
FAT GUY SLEEPING
Smoking and Sleep Apnea:  1+1 = 1000
Both sleep apnea and smoking can cause all sorts of cardiovascular and respiratory health problems. OSA can lead to stroke and heart disease while smoking increases one’s chance of contracting mouth, throat and lung cancer. Studies have even shown that sleep apnea victims who smoke, generally have heightened triglyceride levels and lowered HDL levels.
The Studies
The average person loses 1.2 minutes of sleep for every cigarette they smoke, due to nicotine’s stimulating and subsequent withdrawal effects, according to a  University of Florida study in 2011.
Men’s Health reported, “People who smoke within two hours of bedtime struggle to fall asleep because the nicotine disrupts their natural sleep-wake cycle, and withdrawal symptoms set in before the morning alarm goes off, often leaving smokers feeling even more restless and agitated.”
Patients who suffer from untreated sleep apnea are rarely able to reach the cycles of deep sleep where dreaming occurs. With treatment, patients begin to dream again and it takes time to get used to it.  Vivid dreaming is a common occurrence in those who are in the process of quitting smoking and have begun sleep apnea treatment.
Conclusion
A 20012 report in Chin Med concludes: “Smoking may act as a risk factor for OSA and join with OSA in a common pathway to increase the risk of systematic injury. OSA, in turn, may be a predisposing factor for smoking. Thus, smoking cessation is recommended when considering treatment for OSA, and treating OSA may be a necessary precondition for successful smoking cessation.”
Resources
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
Johns Hopkins University 2008 
University of Florida
Chin Med
Mayo Clinic
WebMD

 

LEARN DENTAL SLEEP MEDICINE in Louisville, KY on JULY 22,23

 3-3-13 EINSTEIN- DISCOVERY

Dr. George Jones will explain the WHY and the HOW of these Obstructive Sleep Apnea connections:

  • WHY is High Blood Pressure a symptom of SA?
  • WHY is Acid Reflux (GERD) a symptom of SA?
  • WHY is Diabetes a symptom of SA?

Learn the risk factors and HOW they contribute to OSA:

  • Excess weight. Fat deposits around your upper airway may obstruct your breathing. However, not everyone who has sleep apnea is overweight. Thin people develop OSA, too.
  • A narrowed airway. You may have inherited a naturally narrow throat. Or, your tonsils or adenoids may become enlarged, which can block your airway. An enlarged or inflamed uvula will block the airway.
    Being male. Men are twice as likely to have sleep apnea. However, women increase their risk if they’re overweight, and their risk also appears to rise after menopause.
  • Age. Sleep apnea occurs much more often in adults over 60.
  • Family history. If you have family members with sleep apnea, you may be at increased risk.
  • Race. In people under 35 years old, blacks are more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea.
  • Use of alcohol, sedatives or tranquilizers. These substances relax the muscles in your throat.
  • Smoking. Smokers are three times more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea than are people who’ve never smoked. Smoking may increase the amount of inflammation and fluid retention in the upper airway. This risk likely drops after you quit smoking.
  • Nasal congestion. If you have difficulty breathing through your nose — whether it’s from an anatomical problem or allergies — you’re more likely to develop obstructive sleep apnea.
  • Neck circumference. People with a thicker neck may have a narrower airway.
https://adental.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/1-30-14-girl-w-tapes-on-neck.jpg
Earn 16 CE credits and become The Sleep Dentist.
Brand yourself as a Doctor who understands, discovers, treats sleep  problems.
Read more about this.  www.TheSleepMagazine.com

 

https://adental.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/1-21-13-logo-dental-pros-sharing.jpg

See the two day course outline and register here: http://join.sleepgroupsolutions.com/seminars/louisville-ky/

George-Jones_2016

Dr. George Jones
Dr. George Jones is a native of Wheeling, WV and earned his BS in Chemistry from Wheeling Jesuit University. He received his Dental Degree from the University Of Florida College Of Dentistry, and relocated to coastal North Carolina in 2003. Over the years, Dr. Jones has served as a consultant and evaluator for several dental manufacturers and maintains a private practice in Sunset Beach, NC. .

WHAT ARE THE RISK FACTORS OF OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA?

Learn Dental Sleep Medicine in Louisville, KY on  July 22-23.

 

 3-3-13 EINSTEIN- DISCOVERY

Dr. George Jones will explain the WHY and the HOW of these Obstructive Sleep Apnea connections:

  • WHY is High Blood Pressure a symptom of SA?
  • WHY is Acid Reflux (GERD) a symptom of SA?
  • WHY is Diabetes a symptom of SA?

Learn the risk factors and HOW they contribute to OSA:

  • Excess weight. Fat deposits around your upper airway may obstruct your breathing. However, not everyone who has sleep apnea is overweight. Thin people develop OSA, too.
  • Neck circumference. People with thicker necks may have narrower airways. Women- greater than 15″ diameter and men-17″ diameter are at greater risk.
  • A narrowed airway. You may have inherited a naturally narrow throat. Or, your tonsils or adenoids may become enlarged, which can block your airway. An enlarged or inflamed uvula will block the airway.
    Being male. Men are twice as likely to have sleep apnea. However, women increase their risk if they’re overweight, and their risk also appears to rise after menopause.
  • Age. Sleep apnea occurs significantly more often in adults over 60.
  • Family history. If you have family members with sleep apnea, you may be at increased risk.
  • Race. In people under 35 years old, blacks are more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea.
  • Use of alcohol, sedatives or tranquilizers. These substances relax the muscles in your throat.
  • Smoking. Smokers are three times more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea than are people who’ve never smoked. Smoking may increase the amount of inflammation and fluid retention in the upper airway. This risk likely drops after you quit smoking.
  • Nasal congestion. If you have difficulty breathing through your nose — whether it’s from an anatomical problem or allergies — you’re more likely to develop obstructive sleep apnea.
https://adental.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/1-30-14-girl-w-tapes-on-neck.jpg
Earn 16 CE credits and become The Sleep Dentist.
Brand yourself as a Doctor who understands, discovers, treats sleep  problems.
Read more about this.  www.TheSleepMagazine.com

 

https://adental.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/1-21-13-logo-dental-pros-sharing.jpg

See the Two day course outline and register here: http://join.sleepgroupsolutions.com/seminars/louisville-ky/

http://sleepgroupsolutions.com/2.0/speakers/73/dr-george-jones

Dr. George Jones is a native of Wheeling, WV and earned his BS in Chemistry from Wheeling Jesuit University. He received his Dental Degree from the University Of Florida College Of Dentistry, and relocated to coastal North Carolina in 2003. Over the years, Dr. Jones has served as a consultant and evaluator for several dental manufacturers and maintains a private practice in Sunset Beach, NC. .

 

IS THERE ANY BETTER OPPORTUNITY IN DENTISTRY TODAY?

THE OPPORTUNITY
It was only three years ago that I read that less than 1% of American licensed dentists were practicing sleep medicine. In those few years that number has risen to 4%. If we have approximately 205,000 practicing dentists in the USA, then there are only 8200 Dentists serving the needs of the multitude of people affected with sleep disorders.According to a Harvard health report there are 18.9 million undiagnosed cases of obstructive sleep apnea and a minimum of 40% – 1.3 million -of CPAP users who are non-compliant. So that alone conservatively projects 20.2 million victims of obstructive sleep apnea who may be helped by a dentist trained in oral appliance therapy (OAT).
Is there any better opportunity in dentistry?

Dental sleep medicine: the hottest button in dentistry today.
Awareness of sleep apnea in America is at an all-time peak. The fires of awareness are being stoked by the public media and by social media. Patients are understanding and becoming increasingly more concerned about the blockage of oxygen to the brain and to other organs. Strokes. Heart attacks. Diabetes. Dementia. Motor vehicle accidents. People are recognizing that they have the symptoms and are asking their Dentists about it. Some doctors have the solutions. Every Dentist would like to be “The Sleep Dentist.”
Seminar training courses are now available through Sleep Group Solutions every week, in different cities, throughout the United States. They are training dentists to discover the victims of sleep apnea and to treat them with the most appropriate modalities. Oral appliance therapy (OAT) is the most convenient and preferred therapy for the mild and moderate cases and for those patients who cannot tolerate the CPAP device. Fortunately, this is where the dentist in shining armor rides in on a white horse to the rescue. Dentists, we like to say, are on the front line of the battle against sleep apnea. Dentists are in the optimum position to see the signs and symptoms and can offer the most preferred solutions to the problem.
 Are you ready to join the battle? 
5-31-12 BRANDIN IRON
STRIKE WHILE THE IRON IS HOT

SLEEP APNEA- 22 MILLION AMERICANS SUFFERING.

 It is estimated that 22 million Americans suffer from sleep apnea, with 80 percent of the cases of moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnea undiagnosed. 
FAT GUY SLEEPING
If we accept the reports that a minimum of 80% of Sleep Apnea is undiagnosed, then only 20% is actually addressed in any fashion.

The undiagnosed may fit into these categories:

1. Patients have no idea that such a thing as Sleep Apnea exists.

       Hard to believe it but there are such people.
2. They know about, but have no idea that they suffer from, Sleep Apnea .
        “Isn’t snoring normal?”  “Doesn’t everyone wake up 4-6 times a night?”
3. They know they have the symptoms of Sleep Apnea but are in denial.
        I know a smart lawyer who insists sleep apnea does not exist. He tells me that I am “just as bad as [his] wife” who listens to him snore and gasp for breath every night.
4. They know they have problems but refuse to do anything about it.
       Some have heard horror stories about CPAP machines and simply do not want to take action. They need to learn about the oral appliance therapy (OAT).
5. Misdiagnosed Sleep Apnea.
        There is a lack of knowledge of sleep apnea among many health professionals.

It is very difficult to get these people to want to be screened and diagnosed by just telling them that something is wrong. It is necessary for them to “see” it for themselves and for them to adopt a top down approach – of their own volition.
The best way to do this is to educate them in the most simple, effective, non intimidating and cost effective way – we can show them films of OSA victims having sleep events.  We must find a way to get them diagnosed and filmed and then show them their results. This is an massive education deficit issue.
8-2-14 MATH FOR DUMMIEsS 8

NATIONAL SLEEP AWARENESS WEEK ends with DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME on March 13th.

 

3-6-12 SPRING FORWARD

We “Spring forward” at 2 AM Sunday night, March 13 and lose an hour of sleep.

Are you planing to get to bed one hour earlier? In order to fulfill the essential number of regenerating sleep cycles an adult requires 7-8 hours of healthy sleep.

Do you sleep soundly or sleep with sound?

7-14-12 SNORING

Are you keeping your partner awake?

"Roar"

Sleep Awareness Week, which takes place this year March 6-13, is an annual public education and awareness campaign to promote the importance of sleep. The week begins by the announcement of the National Sleep Foundation’s Sleep in America and ends with the clock change to Daylight Saving Time, where Americans lose one hour of sleep. This week, focus on sleep education and Sleep Dysfunction screening.

If you are a Dentist consider helping the 34% of your patients that have a sleep breathing disorder. Learn how: www.sleepgs.com

 

The prestigious National Dental Association (NDA) has selected Sleep Group Solutions (SGS) to present “The Successful Treatment of Snoring and Sleep Apnea in the Dental Office” at the 103rd Annual Convention of the NDA in Atlanta, Georgia.
1-21-13 LOGO DENTAL PROS SHARING
SGS, a leader in Dental Sleep Medicine, trains dentists nationally to screen and treat the many victims of sleep apnea. SGS  lecturers present two day CE seminars every weekend in several cities across the country.
The National Dental Association had its earliest beginnings in 1900 when a group of 200 minority practitioners felt they needed a professional organization. After several evolutions, including a name change in 1907 to the Robert T. Freeman Dental Society (in honor of the first Black dental college graduate), in 1932 the National Dental Association was formed.
In 1965, the American Dental Association changed its policies to urge the cessation of discrimination based on race, religion, ethnicity or creed among its member groups and affiliates.
NDA -banner
Dr. Hazel J. Harper became the first female president of the NDA in 1997.
The NDA, with 7000 members,  has grown beyond the national borders of the United States, adding members in Canada and the Caribbean. In 2009, it was working to expand intoAfrica and Saudi Arabia.
If you are a member of the NDA be sure to register for this valuable training. CE credits will be awarded.  http://ndaonline.org/membership

LEARNING DSM TO BUILD A REWARDING PRACTICE

Dr. Barry Freydberg, a nationally recognized authority on the treatment of sleep disorders shared his unique perspective on his very successful Dental Sleep Medicine practice at a training course in Florida on Feb. 12,13.  This was an awesome learning experience.
 FREYDBERG 001
Next up in the DSM training seminars is Charlotte with Dr. George Jones and Las Vegas with Dr. Marty Lipsey.   Both seminars are held on Friday and Saturday, Feb. 19-20.
Included in these A to Z presentations is Medical Insurance billing, Codes, Fees and Procedures.  And you will receive 16 CE credits to jump start your new year.
GENIUS
You will be prepared to do far more as a comprehensive care-giver for your patients and the new ones who seek your services.
Review the course outlines and register here:

02/19/2016 – 02/20/2016
CHARLOTTE, NC CHARLOTTE, NC 

DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Charlotte Airport

02/19/2016 – 02/20/2016 LAS VEGAS, NV LAS VEGAS, NV 

The Westin Las Vegas Hotel – Casino & Spa