OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA- JUST A MAN’S DISEASE??

 

IS SNORING IN KIDS BEING IGNORED?

American Academy of Pediatrics Recommends Screening For Snoring Kids

All kids should be screened for snoring, and those who do snore regularly should be screened for sleep apnea, according to recently released recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

 “If left untreated, OSAS can result in problems such as behavioral issues, cardiovascular problems, poor growth and developmental delays.”

The recommendations come from an analysis of 350 past studies on the subject. They are published in the journal Pediatrics.

Children who have adenotonsillar hypertrophy — the No. 1 cause of obstructive sleep apnea in kids, according to a 2003 study — should have their tonsils and adenoids removed, according to the recommendations.  MedicalNewsToday reported in 2004 on a study showing that tonsil and adenoid removal — known as adenotonsillectomy — is being done more and more for the purposes of obstructive sleep apnea, versus tonsil infection. In fact, nine in 10 tonsil and adenoid removal surgeries are done for sleep apnea reasons.

If a child receives tonsil and adenoid removal surgery for sleep apnea, but still has signs of the condition, he or she should then undergo continuous positive airway pressure, according to the new recommendations.

But for kids who snore who don’t have adenotonsillar hypertrophy, nasal corticosteroid medications should be used, the recommendations said. And if kids who snore are obese or overweight, weight loss could help to relieve symptoms.

HOW TO BENEFIT FROM THE END OF DST


The days are getting shorter. Darkness arrives earlier.in the evening. Daylight Saving Time ends on November 2nd and we turn our clocks back one hour. When we wake up Sunday morning it will be a little darker than yesterday morning. We’ll have one extra hour for sleep.
10-29-13 fall-back 3
In order to fulfill the essential number of regenerating sleep cycles the average adult needs 7-8 hours. A five stage sleep cycle repeats consistently throughout the night. One complete sleep cycle lasts about 90 minutes. So during an average night’s sleep (8 hours), an adult will experience about four or five cycles of sleep.


A Little History of Daylight Saving Time
The concept of setting the clocks ahead in the spring in order to make better use of natural daylight was first introduced in the US by inventor Benjamin Franklin in 1784.

12-30-11 Benjamin_Franklin_1767During his time as an American envoy to France, Ben Franklin publisher of the old English proverb, “Early to bed, and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise” anonymously published a letter suggesting that Parisians economize on candles by rising earlier to use morning sunlight. This 1784 satire proposed taxing shutters, rationing candles, and waking the public by ringing church bells and firing cannons at sunrise.
US President Franklin D. Roosevelt instituted year-round DST in the United States, called “War Time” during World War II from February 9, 1942 to September 30, 1945. The change was implemented 40 days after the bombing of Pearl Harbor and during this time, the U.S. time zones were called “Eastern War Time”, “Central War Time”, and “Pacific War Time”. After the surrender of Japan in mid-August 1945, the time zones were relabeled “Peace Time”.
Congress decided to end the confusion and establish the Uniform Time Act of 1966 that stated DST would begin on the last Sunday of April and end on the last Sunday of October. However, states still had the ability to be exempt from DST by passing a local ordinance.
Healthy nights of sleep are essential to recharge our human organs and maintain good health and longevity. 

 This fall, dentists have the opportunity to spring forward with Dental Sleep Medicine and help the millions of their Sleep Apnea victims. 

Upcoming training seminars by DSM experts are available in the following cities:


Oklahoma City    Dr.Damian Blum
Atlanta                Dr. Marty Lipsey
Hollywood, FL     Dr. Dan Tache’
Boston               Dr Barry Freydberg
Indianapolis        Dr. George Jones
Orlando              Dr Anjoo Ely
LIP 8
You can view the dates and course outlines and register here:
http://sleepgroupsolutions.com/2.0/modules/piCal/index.php?smode=&op=&cid=2

 

WHY DO SOME SEEM TO BE AWAKENED EASILY?

Some of us are known to be “sound sleepers”  That is, we can sleep while our neighbor is blasting his highly amplified distortion of Heavy Metal non-music, or during a 5.0  earthquake or even the freight train roar of a partner’s snoring. Others of us are “light sleepers” and may be awakened by the family cat gliding from the sofa to the floor. These differences exist for children as well as for adults.  Why the difference between these two sleeping modes?
12-15-13 NOCT. BRUX man in bed 
First. let’s take a little look at the science of sleep.
When a human falls asleep, the body and mind experience progressive levels of sleep.  A 5 stage sleep cycle repeats consistently throughout the night. One complete sleep cycle lasts about 90 minutes. So during an average night’s sleep (8 hours), an adult will experience about four or five cycles of sleep.
There are 4 stages of Non-
REM (Non Rapid Eye Movement) and a final stage of REM sleep (Rapid Eye Movement)


SLEEP STAGES

  • The beginning stages of sleep prepare your body to shut down.  This includes dozing off and the ability to be easily awakened by noise or thoughts. 
  • Deep sleep occurs in the later stages – when activity in the body is low and activity in the brain is very high.
  • Stage 1 The Gateway to Sleep. It’s associated with a low arousal threshold and is the shortest duration of sleep- approximately 5%
  • Stage 2 The conscious awareness of the external environment is gone. This is approximately 45% (10-15 minutes)
  • Stages 3 and 4: Deep Sleep (or Delta Sleep) are the most refreshing of the sleep stages. They’re also the sleep stages during which the body releases hormones that contribute to growth and development. Brain activity is slowed, heart rate, respiration and blood pressure are lowered and it is very difficult to wake someone from this Delta sleep stage. This stage is 25%.
  • Incrementally larger stimuli are needed for arousal as sleep progresses thru the 4 stages.
REM SLEEP

  • REM sleep is the last stage of the sleep cycle, 20-25%, and is the stage of sleep where we have our most vivid dreams. The dreams we remember- at least for a few minutes after we wake.
  • REM is not deep sleep like some think.
  • During REM sleep, other physical changes take place — breathing is rapid, the heart beats faster, and the skeletal muscles are paralyzed.- maybe that is nature’s way of protecting us from acting out our dreams.
  • REM sleep episodes lengthen across the night. As the stage 3 and 4 Short Wave Sleep (SWS) segments diminish in length, the REM segments increase.

 

10-15-14 HISTOGM

 

Being awoken in the middle of REM sleep can cause grogginess that has the potential to last throughout the morning and even throughout the day.  This explains why sometimes we sleep for eight or nine hours and still feel like we barely got any rest at all. Waking up in the beginning stages of a sleep cycle is healthy because our bodies are not yet entirely shut down. 

SLEEP NEEDS BY AGE
There’s no one-size-fits-all answer regarding how much daytime sleep people need. It all depends on the age and the sleep total during a 24-hour period. For example, a toddler may sleep 13 hours at night with only some daytime catnapping, while another gets 9 hours at night but takes a solid 2-hour nap each afternoon.
Though sleep needs are highly individual, these age-by-age guidelines give an idea of average daily sleep requirements:

1-14-14 EC lying down
Birth to 6 months: Infants require about 16 to 20 total hours of sleep per day. Younger infants tend to sleep on and off around the clock, waking every 2 or 3 hours to eat. As they approach 4 months of age, sleep rhythms become more established. Most babies sleep 10 to 12 hours at night, usually with an interruption for feeding, and average 3 to 5 hours of sleep during the day (usually grouped into two or three naps).

6 to 12 months: Babies this age usually sleep about 11 hours at night, plus two daytime naps totaling 3 to 4 hours. At this age, most infants do not need to wake at night to feed, but may begin to experience separation anxiety, which can contribute to sleep disturbances.

Toddlers (1 to 3 years): Toddlers generally require 10 to 13 hours of sleep, including an afternoon nap of 1 to 3 hours. Young toddlers might still be taking two naps, but naps should not occur too close to bedtime, as they may make it harder for toddlers to fall asleep at night.

Preschoolers (3 to 5 years): Preschoolers average about 10 to 12 hours at night, plus an afternoon nap. Most give up this nap by 5 years of age.

School-age (5 to 12 years): School-age kids need about 10 to 12 hours at night. Some 5-year-olds might still need a nap, and if a regular nap isn’t possible, they might need an earlier bedtime.
TEENS’ SLEEP
Research shows that teens need 8½ to 9½ hours of sleep a night. So, a teen who needs to wake up for school at 6 a.m. would have to go to bed at 9 p.m. to reach the 9-hour mark. Studies have found that many teens have trouble falling asleep that early, though. It’s not because they don’t want to sleep. It’s because their brains naturally work on later schedules and aren’t ready for bed.
During adolescence, the body’s circadian rhythm (an internal biological clock) is reset, telling a teen to fall asleep later at night and wake up later in the morning. This change in the circadian rhythm seems to be due to the fact that the brain hormone melatonin is produced later at night in teens than it is for kids and adults. So, teenagers have a harder time falling asleep.
Sometimes this delay in the sleep-wake cycle is so severe that it affects a teen’s daily activities. In those cases it’s called delayed sleep phase syndrome, also known as “night owl” syndrome. And if your sleep-deprived teen brings mobile devices into bed, surfing or texting late into the night, the light exposure could also disrupt circadian rhythm and make it harder to sleep.


CONCLUSION

Maybe the “light sleepers” just need to be given a chance to descend into the deep sleep stages before you practice your trumpet lessons.

 SOURCES

1. Sleep. (23 Oct. 2007).WordNet 3.0. Princeton University.
2. National Sleep Foundation. (2002). Sleep in America Poll.
3. Dement, W. C. (1999).e Promise of Sleep
4.National Highway Traffi c Safety Administration. National Survey of Distracted and Drowsy Driving Attitudes and Behavior: 2002.
5.Long, T. (2008). Dec. 3, 1984: Bhopal, ‘Worst Industrial Accident in History’.Wired.
Accessed at http://www.wired.com/science/discoveries/news/2008/12/dayintech_1203 .
6.United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. (2013).
Backgrounder on Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Accident.Accessed at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/fact-sheets/chernobyl-bg.html .
7. National Geographic New, 24 Feb. 2005.
8. Personal account with the author.
9. Dement, W. C. (1999).e Promise of Sleep
10.Circadian Rhythm. (29 Oct. 2007).American Heritage ScienceDictionary. Houghton-Miffl in.
11.Butkov. (2007).Fundamentals of Sleep Technology.
12.Sleep Management Services. (2002)Principles of Polysomnography.
13.Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine, 3rd ed.
14.Sleep Management Services. (2002).Principles of Polysomnography.
15.Butkov. (2007).Fundamentals of Sleep Technology.
16. Suzuki, K., et al., (2003). Sleep. 26(6).
17. National Sleep Foundation. (2007). Sleep in America Poll

 

 


For Children, Consistent Bedtime is as Important as Sleep Quality and Quantity.

1-14-14 EC lying down

There are numerous studies on the quality and the quantity of sleep for children. Now there is insight to the regularity of children’s sleep.  It is found that the consistent nature of bedtimes during early childhood is related to cognitive performance. Considering the importance of early child development, this may be an influence for health throughout life.

7-7-12 SLEEPING ON THE BOOK

A study out of the United Kingdom revealed that inconsistent bedtimes for young children result in lower scores on reading, math, and spatial awareness tests administered at age 7, compared to children who went to bed at the same time every night.
This research is particularly interesting because it zeroes in on the timing of sleep and the issue of bedtime consistency, apart from sleep quality or quantity. In the study, 11,178 children whose bedtimes were irregular at ages 3, 5, and 7 were tested at age 7.

7-14-1`2 teacher and sleeper

Study Results

 At age 7, not having a regular bedtime was related to lower cognitive test scores in girls: reading (β: −0.22), maths (β: −0.26) and spatial (β: −0.15), but not for boys. Non-regular bedtimes at age 3 were independently associated, in girls and boys, with lower reading (β: −0.10, −0.20), maths (β: −0.16, −0.11) and spatial (β: −0.13, −0.16) scores. Cumulative relationships were apparent. Girls who never had regular bedtimes at ages 3, 5 and 7 had significantly lower reading (β: −0.36), maths (β: −0.51) and spatial (β: −0.40) scores, while for boys this was the case for those having non-regular bedtimes at any two ages (3, 5 or 7 years): reading (β: −0.28), maths (β: −0.22) and spatial (β: −0.26) scores. In boys having non-regular bedtimes at all three ages (3, 5 and 7 years) were non-significantly related to lower reading, maths and spatial scores.
References
“Time for Bed: associations with cognitive performance in 7 year old children: a longitudinal population based study”
Yvonne Kelly, John Kelly, Amanda Sacker
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health
, University College London, London, UK
Published Online First
8 July 2013

DENTISTS STRIKE GOLD IN SAN FRANCISCO

 

10-5-14 GOLD RUSH 6Attending the Sleep Group Solutions training seminar on Sleep Dysfunctions in San Fransisco, a new team of dentists prospected for gold and found it there.
Dr. Marty Lipsey presented a two day comprehensive course which included:

  •  The science of sleep,
  •  Identifying the 34% of their patients who were Sleep Apnea victims,
  •  Patient Education,
  •  Case Presentation and Treatment Acceptance,
  •  Understanding and handling the comorbidities,
  •  Hands-on working with the popular Oral Appliances including TAP, Respire, EMA, Silent Night and others,
  •  Sleep Apnea Medical Insurance Codes, Fees, Billing Procedures.

9-27-14 MS  SAN FRAN.FROM BACK.jA

These lucky dentists who struck it rich are now able to begin screening and treating their patients who desperately need their help.

Next up in Dental Sleep Medicine courses (16 CEU) :

          Pick your expert or city:

10th October 2014 Friday
11th October 2014 Saturday
Charleston, SC – Dr. Jeffrey Horowitz
17th October 2014 Friday
18th October 2014 Saturday
Washington, D.C. – Dr.George Jones
17th October 2014 Friday
18th October 2014 Saturday
Portland, OR – Dr. Barry Freydberg
24th October 2014 Friday
25th October 2014 Saturday
Philadelphia, PA – Dr. Damian Blum
24th October 2014 Friday
25th October 2014 Saturday
Dallas, TX –     Dr. Marty Lipsey
7th November 2014 Friday
8th November 2014 Saturday
Oklahoma City, OK – Dr. Damian Blum
7th November 2014 Friday
8th November 2014 Saturday
Atlanta, GA –    Dr. Marty Lipsey
14th November 2014 Friday
15th November 2014 Saturday
Hollywood, FL – ADVANCED Dr. Dan Tache’
14th November 2014 Friday
15th November 2014 Saturday
Boston, MA – Dr. Barry Freydberg

Read the course outline, see the speakers and register here to get your gold:    http://sleepgroupsolutions.com/2.0/modules/piCal/index.php?smode=&op=&cid=2

10-5-14 GOLD RUSH 1

IS 13 YOUR LUCKY NUMBER?

On Sept. 12th and 13th you are given the chance to win big in
Hartford, CT or in Las Vegas, NV

9-6-14 DICE

On Fri. and Sat., September 12, 13, you can pick your training by either of these two most respected Dental Sleep Medicine educators in the nation.

Sleep Group Solutions presents:

Dr. Anjoo Ely in Hartford

Dr. Marty Lipsey in Las Vegas

The choice is yours; either way, next week YOU WIN!

 

8-3-14 SAW WOODThe current need and “buzz” is in discovering and treating sleep apnea.  Patients are asking their Dentists about sleep apnea. How comfortable are YOU with the answers? It is reported that less than 4% of practicing Dentists are able to assist the more than 50 million people who suffer from sleep apnea. There is a growing public awareness of the hazards that come from a nocturnal stoppage of breathing. Your patients are becoming increasingly more concerned about the blockage of oxygen to the brain and other organs. Strokes. Heart attacks. Diabetes. As a Care Giver, think of how you can serve.  Serve an unfilled need.

These 2 day courses are designed to provide you with the knowledge to confidently return to your practice and immediately begin implementing new screening and treatment protocols.

1-21-13 LOGO DENTAL PROS SHARING

You can learn more about the courses and register for one here:  http://sleepgroupsolutions.com/2.0/modules/piCal/index.php?smode=&op=&cid=2

Dr. Marty Lipsey

Dr. Marty Lipsey Dr. Marty Lipsey, received his DDS degree from UCLA and a Master of Science from Northwestern University Dental School. Dr. Lipsey is the founder of Dental Sleep Med Systems, offering dental teams assistance in implementing and/or improving their dental sleep medicine practices, including electronic medical billing and successful insurance coding and processing. Dr. Lipsey is a Sleep Group Solutions Instructor, and teaches Dental Sleep Medicine regularly.

 Dr. Anjoo ElyDr. Anjoo Ely
Dr. Ely  is a graduate of the University of Michigan Dental School 1997, and is a Member of the American Dental Association, Michigan Dental Association, and American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine. Dr. Ely’s passion for Dental Sleep Medicine stems from her loss of her father at a young age due to suspected undiagnosed sleep apnea. Her passion is not just treating sleep apnea patients but also educating more dentists to be able to treat their sleep affected patients.

 

“I’m thinking of taking the Dental Sleep Medicine training.”

How many great ideas have you had in your life that were exciting… seemed important to you… that had to be done… that could improve the world….that could improve YOUR world?  You thought about it, talked to confidants about it, put it off day after day and then, fssst! Gone! Forgotten, or worse, watched someone else do it and get the credit for it. You’re in good company; we are all procrastinators to some degree.  Me, too.
thinkerWhen there’s a good idea, it’s in “the air”.  A lot of people will think of it at the same time; but the person that takes action will be called the genius.   DSM is one of those “ideas”… it may be the best one you will have. There is a DSM bandwagon- JUMP ON IT!

               UPCOMING DSM TRAINING SEMINARS

  Hartford, CT –         Dr. Ely        September 12th and 13th
  Las Vegas, NV –      Dr. Lipsey     September 12th and 13th
  Chicago, IL –          Dr. Lipsey     September 19th and 20th
  Newark, NJ –          Dr. Blum        September 19th and 20th

More and more dentists are getting trained and implementing Sleep Apnea screening and treatment into their patient services. Are you going to wait and watch your colleagues become “sleep dentists”?

 “Action speaks louder than words but not nearly as often.”  Mark Twain
                                        IF IT’S A GOOD IDEA, DO IT NOW

 6-16-12 BUTTON #2

“Procrastination is the bad habit of putting off until the day after tomorrow what should have been done the day before yesterday.”   Napoleon Hill

THREE POWERHOUSES OF DENTAL SLEEEP MEDICINE

Sleep Apnea victims will not have to go untreated in YOUR office. 

SUBJECT:             Introduction to Dental Sleep Medicine
DATE:                    August 22nd and 23rd – Friday and Saturday
TIME:                      8 A.M. to 5 P.M.
LOCATION:            Irvine, California  at The Glidewell International Tech Center
PRESENTERS:     Dr. Barry Freydberg,  Mr. John Nadeau,  Dr. Marty Lipsey

6-16-12 BUTTON #216 CE Credits

This 2 day course is designed to provide you with the knowledge to confidently return to your practice and immediately begin implementing new screening and treatment protocols.

The course includes:

  • Patient Education,
  • The Fascinating Science of Sleep,
  • Case Presentation and Treatment Acceptance,
  • Hands-on working with the popular Oral Appliances including TAP, Respire, EMA, Silent Night and others,
  • Sleep Apnea Medical Insurance Codes, Fees, and Billing Procedures,
  • And much more.

10-14-12 RESPIRE BLUEReview the course outline and register here: http://sleepgroupsolutions.com/2.0/modules/piCal/index.php?action=View&event_id=0000003056

Dr. Barry Freydberg,  is a Fellow of the Academy of General Dentistry, a Fellow of the International College of Dentists, a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and a Fellow of the International Academy for Dental-Facial Esthetics. He is considered a pioneer in raising dentists’ awareness of the ever-growing link between high technology and practice and clinical management. Barry is a frequent presenter of Sleep Group Solutions’ training seminars.

Mr. John Nadeau, SGS Vice President,  has been actively involved in the dental sleep medicine community since 2002. He has worked with several hundred dentists in the field and helped many of them get started with sleep in their own practices. An expert on airway acoustic imaging and home sleep testing John authored the SGS protocol manual detailing the steps-by-step process involved in taking a patient from initial screening through diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. John’s passion for dental sleep medicine comes through strongly in his lectures and he has been an invited guest instructor at many dental meetings and teaching facilities across North America.
Dr. Marty Lipsey, presenting Saturday, is one of the foremost authorities on electronic medical billing and successful insurance coding and processing for Sleep Apnea services. He trains dental practices from New York to Los Angeles in Dental Sleep Medicine and Medical Billing systems.

 This is an opportunity to stand out in your community as a skilled leader in discovering and treating the victims of Sleep Apnea. One of every three patients you see have the symptoms of Sleep Apnea. Do you want to help them?5-20-12 HUMAN PYRP.S.

By the way, did you know how many motor vehicle accidents each year can be blamed on fatigue? The number is 100,000 and climbing, according to the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Think of this way: can you imagine how much safer our roads would be if everyone would just get enough HEALTHY sleep?

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/1374511

 

The choice is yours; either way, next week YOU WIN!

The winners in this difficult economy will be those Dentists who are able to offer the combination of patient engagement and niche marketing.

On Fri. and Sat., August 15, 16, you can chose between training by two of the most respected Dental Sleep Medicine educators in the nation. Sleep Group Solutions presents:

Dr. Damian Blum in Boston, MA 

Dr. Dan Tache’ in Minneapolis, MN

.   Those Dentists who convince people that they understand their needs, truly care about them, and have a unique and essential service to offer, will stand out.  Patients’ priorities have changed. The money is still there. They are willing and ready to spend money on their priorities.

5-31-12 HOT IRON 2STRIKE WHILE THE IRON IS HOT!

The current need and “buzz” is in discovering and treating sleep apnea.  Patients are asking their Dentists about sleep apnea. How comfortable are YOU with the answers? It is reported that less than 4% of practicing Dentists are able to assist the more than 50 million people who suffer from sleep apnea. There is a growing public awareness of the hazards that come from a nocturnal stoppage of breathing. Your patients are becoming increasingly more concerned about the blockage of oxygen to the brain and other organs. Strokes. Heart attacks. Diabetes. As a Care Giver, think of how you can serve. Serve an unfilled need.

Your patient doesn’t want to buy crowns and fillings. Your patient wants to buy YOU. Once a patient likes you, trusts you, believes in you, and knows you are REALLY concerned about them, they will want to accept your recommendations. BUILD RELATIONSHIPS.

Here’s a mnemonic for you to remember:

STAND UP for what you believe in. Be a complete healer.

STAND OUT with a unique and valuable service.

BE OUTSTANDING !

 

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