LEARN DENTAL SLEEP MEDICINE in Louisville, KY on JULY 22,23

 3-3-13 EINSTEIN- DISCOVERY

Dr. George Jones will explain the WHY and the HOW of these Obstructive Sleep Apnea connections:

  • WHY is High Blood Pressure a symptom of SA?
  • WHY is Acid Reflux (GERD) a symptom of SA?
  • WHY is Diabetes a symptom of SA?

Learn the risk factors and HOW they contribute to OSA:

  • Excess weight. Fat deposits around your upper airway may obstruct your breathing. However, not everyone who has sleep apnea is overweight. Thin people develop OSA, too.
  • A narrowed airway. You may have inherited a naturally narrow throat. Or, your tonsils or adenoids may become enlarged, which can block your airway. An enlarged or inflamed uvula will block the airway.
    Being male. Men are twice as likely to have sleep apnea. However, women increase their risk if they’re overweight, and their risk also appears to rise after menopause.
  • Age. Sleep apnea occurs much more often in adults over 60.
  • Family history. If you have family members with sleep apnea, you may be at increased risk.
  • Race. In people under 35 years old, blacks are more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea.
  • Use of alcohol, sedatives or tranquilizers. These substances relax the muscles in your throat.
  • Smoking. Smokers are three times more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea than are people who’ve never smoked. Smoking may increase the amount of inflammation and fluid retention in the upper airway. This risk likely drops after you quit smoking.
  • Nasal congestion. If you have difficulty breathing through your nose — whether it’s from an anatomical problem or allergies — you’re more likely to develop obstructive sleep apnea.
  • Neck circumference. People with a thicker neck may have a narrower airway.
https://adental.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/1-30-14-girl-w-tapes-on-neck.jpg
Earn 16 CE credits and become The Sleep Dentist.
Brand yourself as a Doctor who understands, discovers, treats sleep  problems.
Read more about this.  www.TheSleepMagazine.com

 

https://adental.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/1-21-13-logo-dental-pros-sharing.jpg

See the two day course outline and register here: http://join.sleepgroupsolutions.com/seminars/louisville-ky/

George-Jones_2016

Dr. George Jones
Dr. George Jones is a native of Wheeling, WV and earned his BS in Chemistry from Wheeling Jesuit University. He received his Dental Degree from the University Of Florida College Of Dentistry, and relocated to coastal North Carolina in 2003. Over the years, Dr. Jones has served as a consultant and evaluator for several dental manufacturers and maintains a private practice in Sunset Beach, NC. .

WHAT ARE THE RISK FACTORS OF OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA?

Learn Dental Sleep Medicine in Louisville, KY on  July 22-23.

 

 3-3-13 EINSTEIN- DISCOVERY

Dr. George Jones will explain the WHY and the HOW of these Obstructive Sleep Apnea connections:

  • WHY is High Blood Pressure a symptom of SA?
  • WHY is Acid Reflux (GERD) a symptom of SA?
  • WHY is Diabetes a symptom of SA?

Learn the risk factors and HOW they contribute to OSA:

  • Excess weight. Fat deposits around your upper airway may obstruct your breathing. However, not everyone who has sleep apnea is overweight. Thin people develop OSA, too.
  • Neck circumference. People with thicker necks may have narrower airways. Women- greater than 15″ diameter and men-17″ diameter are at greater risk.
  • A narrowed airway. You may have inherited a naturally narrow throat. Or, your tonsils or adenoids may become enlarged, which can block your airway. An enlarged or inflamed uvula will block the airway.
    Being male. Men are twice as likely to have sleep apnea. However, women increase their risk if they’re overweight, and their risk also appears to rise after menopause.
  • Age. Sleep apnea occurs significantly more often in adults over 60.
  • Family history. If you have family members with sleep apnea, you may be at increased risk.
  • Race. In people under 35 years old, blacks are more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea.
  • Use of alcohol, sedatives or tranquilizers. These substances relax the muscles in your throat.
  • Smoking. Smokers are three times more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea than are people who’ve never smoked. Smoking may increase the amount of inflammation and fluid retention in the upper airway. This risk likely drops after you quit smoking.
  • Nasal congestion. If you have difficulty breathing through your nose — whether it’s from an anatomical problem or allergies — you’re more likely to develop obstructive sleep apnea.
https://adental.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/1-30-14-girl-w-tapes-on-neck.jpg
Earn 16 CE credits and become The Sleep Dentist.
Brand yourself as a Doctor who understands, discovers, treats sleep  problems.
Read more about this.  www.TheSleepMagazine.com

 

https://adental.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/1-21-13-logo-dental-pros-sharing.jpg

See the Two day course outline and register here: http://join.sleepgroupsolutions.com/seminars/louisville-ky/

http://sleepgroupsolutions.com/2.0/speakers/73/dr-george-jones

Dr. George Jones is a native of Wheeling, WV and earned his BS in Chemistry from Wheeling Jesuit University. He received his Dental Degree from the University Of Florida College Of Dentistry, and relocated to coastal North Carolina in 2003. Over the years, Dr. Jones has served as a consultant and evaluator for several dental manufacturers and maintains a private practice in Sunset Beach, NC. .

 

Scary connection: Sleep Apnea and Acid Reflux

10-28-14 GHOST 1

How it happens:
During the cessations of breathing the body will increase its efforts to take in air.
Abdominal contractions are exaggerated and increase until breathing resumes.
The contractions squeeze the stomach and force acid up the esophagus.
The efforts to breathe also increase a negative pressure in the esophagus which also
 pull up acid.

Become a Sleep Medicine Dentist and help your patients that have these Sleep Apnea connected comorbidities and symptoms-
Diabetes, High Blood Pressure, GERD, headaches, nocturnal bruxism.

Explanations like this are presented in upcoming Sleep Apnea seminars.
You can view the course outlines and register here:

Oct 2015

ATLANTA, GA –           10/16/2015 – 10/17/2015 Register Now! 
LOS ANGELES, CA – 10/16/2015 – 10/17/2015 Register Now! 
SEATTLE, WA –         10/23/2015 – 10/24/2015 Register Now! 

Nov 2015

PHILADELPHIA, PA –   11/06/2015 – 11/07/2015 Register Now! 
SALT LAKE CITY, UT – 11/06/2015 – 11/07/2015 Register Now! 
IRVINE, CA –                 11/13/2015 – 11/14/2015 Register Now! 
OKLAHOMA CITY, OK –11/13/2015 – 11/14/2015 Register Now! 
LAS VEGAS, NV –          11/20/2015 – 11/21/2015 Register Now! 
MEMPHIS, TN –              11/20/2015 – 11/21/2015 Register Now! 

Scary connection between Sleep Apnea and Acid Reflux

10-28-14 GHOST 1

Most Sleep Apnea sufferers have Acid Reflux…. and other comorbidities.

How it happens:
During the cessations of breathing the body will increase its efforts to take in air.
Abdominal contractions are exaggerated and increase until breathing resumes.
The contractions squeeze the stomach and force acid up the esophagus.
The efforts to breathe also increase a negative pressure in the esophagus which also pull up acid.

Become a Sleep Medicine Dentist and help your patients that have these Sleep Apnea connected comorbidities and symptoms-
Diabetes, High Blood Pressure, GERD, headaches, nocturnal bruxism.

Explanations like this are presented in the upcoming Sleep Apnea seminars.
You can view the course outlines and register here:

Oct 2015

ATLANTA, GA –           10/16/2015 – 10/17/2015 Register Now! 
LOS ANGELES, CA – 10/16/2015 – 10/17/2015 Register Now! 
SEATTLE, WA –         10/23/2015 – 10/24/2015 Register Now! 

Nov 2015

PHILADELPHIA, PA –   11/06/2015 – 11/07/2015 Register Now! 
SALT LAKE CITY, UT – 11/06/2015 – 11/07/2015 Register Now! 
IRVINE, CA –                 11/13/2015 – 11/14/2015 Register Now! 
OKLAHOMA CITY, OK –11/13/2015 – 11/14/2015 Register Now! 
LAS VEGAS, NV –          11/20/2015 – 11/21/2015 Register Now! 
MEMPHIS, TN –              11/20/2015 – 11/21/2015 Register Now! 

 

HAVE INSOMNIA? HERE ARE THE “DOs” and “DONTs”

counting-sheep. a
Insomnia is ubiquitous. Almost everyone experiences insomnia at some point, especially as we age. Why? According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), short-term insomnia can result from stress, depression, diet, jet lag and other causes. Here are some causes and solutions.
1. Caffeine
DON’T
Caffeine is a powerful stimulant. Even one cup will have you racing all day. It can also increase nighttime urination and adversely impact your sleep, according to Andrew Weil, MD, founder and director of the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona.
DO
Caffeine can stay in your system for up to 7 hours, so if you have trouble sleeping, drink it before noon.
2. Alcohol
DON’T
University of Maryland Medical Center reports that about 10-15% of chronic insomnia cases result from substance abuse, especially alcohol. Excess alcohol tends to fragment sleep and cause you to wake every few hours.
DO
Limit yourself to one or two drinks with dinner.
3. Sleeping Pills
DON’T
Sleeping pills come with a lot of risky baggage and they’ve been linked to negative side effects like headaches, nausea, fatigue, memory loss, addiction and parasomnias such as sleep walking. Long time use of these chemicals in your systems can make you feel like you’re always in a fog.
DO
Try natural alternatives like melatonin: It’s a hormone produced in your body that controls your sleep cycle. As we age, melatonin levels drop, so you may want to try a supplement. 
Blue light emitted from your electronic devices can mess up your body's sleep cues.
4. Lights Out!
DON’T
Light emitting devices stimulate and engage the mind, which is the opposite of what you want to be doing right before bed.
DO
Cell phones, laptops, iPads, TVs, night lights—they all need to be switched off if you expect to get a good night’s sleep. All the way off. Prevent any light from coming into your retinae. Wear an eye mask. Open the blinds or go outside as soon as you wake to get energized
5. Up in Smoke
DON’T
Nicotine is a natural stimulant, so it keeps you from falling asleep. Even worse, withdrawal pangs may keep you awake at night. Studies show that smokers are four times more likely to feel not as well rested after a night’s sleep than nonsmokers.
DO
As if you needed another reason to quit.
6. Eat early and eat well 
DON’T
Digesting food requires energy, so if you eat a heavy meal late at night, your body will be hard at work digesting when it should be sleeping. Steer clear of greasy or fatty foods before bed as well, as they cause reflux which can wake you up during the night, says Sandra Fryhofer, MD, from the Council on Science and Public Health.
DO
Eat balanced meals throughout the day, and make breakfast your biggest.  Cherries are a great source for naturally boosting your melatonin levels. “When consumed regularly, tart cherries may help regulate the body’s natural sleep cycle and increase sleep efficiency, including decreasing the time it takes to fall asleep,” says Russel J. Reiter, PhD, one of the world’s leading authorities on melatonin. (In fact, drinking cherry juice was shown to help people sleep 90 more minutes a night.)
Eat cherries for a boost of melatonin.
7. Stay cool
DO
When your body temperature drops, you start to produce more melatonin, so keep your bedroom temperature between 65° and 75°F. Taking a hot shower or bath right before bed helps too, since the quick drop of temperature after you get out makes you feel sleepy.

When your body temperature drops, you produce more melatonin
8. Consistent  Exercise
DO
Some say that exercising in the evening makes elusive sleep harder to find, but it really depends on the person. Find the time of day that exercise makes your body most happy, and stick with it. One study showed that having a regular exercise schedule helped insomniacs feel less depressed and more energized throughout the day.
9. Say om to yoga.
DO
Gentle yoga before sleep will put your mind and body to rest. You can even do these easy poses in bed!
Short meditation: Sit cross-legged on your bed and lean back slightly onto your pillows. Rest your hands on your thighs, close your eyes and just breathe for a few minutes.
Cross-legged bend: Still in this position, bend forward from your hips and stretch your arms out in front of you on the bed. Stay here for a few minutes.
Reclining twist: Lie flat on your bed. Hug your right knee into your chest, then twist your leg across your body to the left while turning your head to the right. Lower your leg, and then do the same with your left leg.
10. Consistent Sleep Schedule
DO
The National Sleep Foundation recommends that you stick to a regular bedtime routine. That means going to sleep and waking up at the same time every day (yes, even weekends!). Try to avoid spending more time in bed than you need. Maintaining good light hygiene will help: Shut out all light at bedtime, open the blinds or go outside as soon as you wake to get energized.

 

Scary that most Sleep Apnea victims have Acid Reflux…. and other comorbidities.

10-28-14 GHOST 1

The Causes:
During the cessations of breathing the body will increase its efforts to take in air.
Abdominal contractions are exaggerated and increase until breathing resumes.
The contractions squeeze the stomach and force acid up the esophagus.
The efforts to breathe also increase a negative pressure in the esophagus which also pull up acid.

Become a Sleep Medicine Dentist and help your patients that have these Sleep Apnea connected comorbidities and symptoms-
Diabetes, High Blood Pressure GERD, headaches, nocturnal bruxism.

Explanations like this are presented in the upcoming Sleep Apnea seminars:
Oklahoma City    Dr.Damian Blum
Atlanta                 Dr. Marty Lipsey
Hollywood, FL     Dr. Dan Tache’
Boston                
Dr Barry Freydberg
Indianapolis        Dr. George Jones
Orlando               Dr Anjoo Ely
Miami                 
Dr Barry Freydberg
Houston              
Dr.Damian Blum
Scottsdale           Dr. Marty Lipsey

You can view the dates and course outlines and register here:
http://sleepgroupsolutions.com/2.0/modules/piCal/index.php?smode=&op=&cid=2

6-16-12 BUTTON #2

HOW TO BENEFIT FROM THE END OF DST


The days are getting shorter. Darkness arrives earlier.in the evening. Daylight Saving Time ends on November 2nd and we turn our clocks back one hour. When we wake up Sunday morning it will be a little darker than yesterday morning. We’ll have one extra hour for sleep.
10-29-13 fall-back 3
In order to fulfill the essential number of regenerating sleep cycles the average adult needs 7-8 hours. A five stage sleep cycle repeats consistently throughout the night. One complete sleep cycle lasts about 90 minutes. So during an average night’s sleep (8 hours), an adult will experience about four or five cycles of sleep.


A Little History of Daylight Saving Time
The concept of setting the clocks ahead in the spring in order to make better use of natural daylight was first introduced in the US by inventor Benjamin Franklin in 1784.

12-30-11 Benjamin_Franklin_1767During his time as an American envoy to France, Ben Franklin publisher of the old English proverb, “Early to bed, and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise” anonymously published a letter suggesting that Parisians economize on candles by rising earlier to use morning sunlight. This 1784 satire proposed taxing shutters, rationing candles, and waking the public by ringing church bells and firing cannons at sunrise.
US President Franklin D. Roosevelt instituted year-round DST in the United States, called “War Time” during World War II from February 9, 1942 to September 30, 1945. The change was implemented 40 days after the bombing of Pearl Harbor and during this time, the U.S. time zones were called “Eastern War Time”, “Central War Time”, and “Pacific War Time”. After the surrender of Japan in mid-August 1945, the time zones were relabeled “Peace Time”.
Congress decided to end the confusion and establish the Uniform Time Act of 1966 that stated DST would begin on the last Sunday of April and end on the last Sunday of October. However, states still had the ability to be exempt from DST by passing a local ordinance.
Healthy nights of sleep are essential to recharge our human organs and maintain good health and longevity. 

 This fall, dentists have the opportunity to spring forward with Dental Sleep Medicine and help the millions of their Sleep Apnea victims. 

Upcoming training seminars by DSM experts are available in the following cities:


Oklahoma City    Dr.Damian Blum
Atlanta                Dr. Marty Lipsey
Hollywood, FL     Dr. Dan Tache’
Boston               Dr Barry Freydberg
Indianapolis        Dr. George Jones
Orlando              Dr Anjoo Ely
LIP 8
You can view the dates and course outlines and register here:
http://sleepgroupsolutions.com/2.0/modules/piCal/index.php?smode=&op=&cid=2

 

What would make YOU stand out and be sought out as a Dentist?

I’m sure you understand that now, more than ever, you need to stand out and be able to offer not only EXCELLENCE, but also DIFFERENCE. In this sluggish economy, where there is a perception of “financial doom”, (I personally don’t believe in that.), dental consumers have a tight hold on their wallets and reports of dental service acceptance show a concerning drop.
11-30-11 WALLET
What would make YOU stand out and be sought out?
WHAT ‘UNIQUENESS” ARE PATIENTS LOOKING FOR TODAY?
9-11-14 How_to_create_your_Uniqueness_in_the_Market_Place_1
What are YOU doing now to offer a unique service? Your First Class Service and Patient Engagement are expected as basic “givens”. But what is your clinical niche?
Are YOU the dental practice they must go to? Are you the only practice around that offers “invisible” braces, or mini-implant dentures or Nutritional Analysis ?  Are you the “Holistic Dentist”, the “Soft Tissue Management Dentist”, the “Snooze Dentist”,  the “Snore Dentist”? Are you the “Sleep Dysfunction Dentist”?
EVOLUTION OF DENTAL DEMAND
Remember how it was about 20 years ago when teeth whitening (aka “bleaching”) was the “new kid on the block”- THE “HOT BUTTON”? If you had an “in-office” Bright Smile or Zoom machine, you could schedule an operatory all day long with patients from near and far. After that we had the “porcelain age of dentistry”, when the media made patients very image-conscious for “smile enhancements” at any cost while the public was more confident in the future of the economy . Teeth whitening is now offered in nearly every practice, and in most as a discounted loss leader. Cosmetic crowns and veneers are now a lower patient priority.
Implants were the next rage in dental attractions. Today most dental practices are offering implants.
SO, WHERE ARE WE NOW?
What would make YOU stand out and be sought out?
 9-11-14 UNIQUE BULB
Dental Sleep Medicine is where Teeth Whitening was 20 years ago.
It is the “hot button” where Implant Dentistry was 10 years ago.
Strike while the iron is hot.
DSM can be your uniqueness to serve the needs of 34% of your existing patients and attract many new patients.    Take the training and stand out as the “go-to” dentist in your area.
9-11-14 UNIQUE ON PEDESTAL

“I’m thinking of taking the Dental Sleep Medicine training.”

How many great ideas have you had in your life that were exciting… seemed important to you… that had to be done… that could improve the world….that could improve YOUR world?  You thought about it, talked to confidants about it, put it off day after day and then, fssst! Gone! Forgotten, or worse, watched someone else do it and get the credit for it. You’re in good company; we are all procrastinators to some degree.  Me, too.
thinkerWhen there’s a good idea, it’s in “the air”.  A lot of people will think of it at the same time; but the person that takes action will be called the genius.   DSM is one of those “ideas”… it may be the best one you will have. There is a DSM bandwagon- JUMP ON IT!

               UPCOMING DSM TRAINING SEMINARS

  Hartford, CT –         Dr. Ely        September 12th and 13th
  Las Vegas, NV –      Dr. Lipsey     September 12th and 13th
  Chicago, IL –          Dr. Lipsey     September 19th and 20th
  Newark, NJ –          Dr. Blum        September 19th and 20th

More and more dentists are getting trained and implementing Sleep Apnea screening and treatment into their patient services. Are you going to wait and watch your colleagues become “sleep dentists”?

 “Action speaks louder than words but not nearly as often.”  Mark Twain
                                        IF IT’S A GOOD IDEA, DO IT NOW

 6-16-12 BUTTON #2

“Procrastination is the bad habit of putting off until the day after tomorrow what should have been done the day before yesterday.”   Napoleon Hill

THREE POWERHOUSES OF DENTAL SLEEEP MEDICINE

Sleep Apnea victims will not have to go untreated in YOUR office. 

SUBJECT:             Introduction to Dental Sleep Medicine
DATE:                    August 22nd and 23rd – Friday and Saturday
TIME:                      8 A.M. to 5 P.M.
LOCATION:            Irvine, California  at The Glidewell International Tech Center
PRESENTERS:     Dr. Barry Freydberg,  Mr. John Nadeau,  Dr. Marty Lipsey

6-16-12 BUTTON #216 CE Credits

This 2 day course is designed to provide you with the knowledge to confidently return to your practice and immediately begin implementing new screening and treatment protocols.

The course includes:

  • Patient Education,
  • The Fascinating Science of Sleep,
  • Case Presentation and Treatment Acceptance,
  • Hands-on working with the popular Oral Appliances including TAP, Respire, EMA, Silent Night and others,
  • Sleep Apnea Medical Insurance Codes, Fees, and Billing Procedures,
  • And much more.

10-14-12 RESPIRE BLUEReview the course outline and register here: http://sleepgroupsolutions.com/2.0/modules/piCal/index.php?action=View&event_id=0000003056

Dr. Barry Freydberg,  is a Fellow of the Academy of General Dentistry, a Fellow of the International College of Dentists, a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and a Fellow of the International Academy for Dental-Facial Esthetics. He is considered a pioneer in raising dentists’ awareness of the ever-growing link between high technology and practice and clinical management. Barry is a frequent presenter of Sleep Group Solutions’ training seminars.

Mr. John Nadeau, SGS Vice President,  has been actively involved in the dental sleep medicine community since 2002. He has worked with several hundred dentists in the field and helped many of them get started with sleep in their own practices. An expert on airway acoustic imaging and home sleep testing John authored the SGS protocol manual detailing the steps-by-step process involved in taking a patient from initial screening through diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. John’s passion for dental sleep medicine comes through strongly in his lectures and he has been an invited guest instructor at many dental meetings and teaching facilities across North America.
Dr. Marty Lipsey, presenting Saturday, is one of the foremost authorities on electronic medical billing and successful insurance coding and processing for Sleep Apnea services. He trains dental practices from New York to Los Angeles in Dental Sleep Medicine and Medical Billing systems.

 This is an opportunity to stand out in your community as a skilled leader in discovering and treating the victims of Sleep Apnea. One of every three patients you see have the symptoms of Sleep Apnea. Do you want to help them?5-20-12 HUMAN PYRP.S.

By the way, did you know how many motor vehicle accidents each year can be blamed on fatigue? The number is 100,000 and climbing, according to the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Think of this way: can you imagine how much safer our roads would be if everyone would just get enough HEALTHY sleep?

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/1374511