LEARN DENTAL SLEEP MEDICINE in Louisville, KY on JULY 22,23

 3-3-13 EINSTEIN- DISCOVERY

Dr. George Jones will explain the WHY and the HOW of these Obstructive Sleep Apnea connections:

  • WHY is High Blood Pressure a symptom of SA?
  • WHY is Acid Reflux (GERD) a symptom of SA?
  • WHY is Diabetes a symptom of SA?

Learn the risk factors and HOW they contribute to OSA:

  • Excess weight. Fat deposits around your upper airway may obstruct your breathing. However, not everyone who has sleep apnea is overweight. Thin people develop OSA, too.
  • A narrowed airway. You may have inherited a naturally narrow throat. Or, your tonsils or adenoids may become enlarged, which can block your airway. An enlarged or inflamed uvula will block the airway.
    Being male. Men are twice as likely to have sleep apnea. However, women increase their risk if they’re overweight, and their risk also appears to rise after menopause.
  • Age. Sleep apnea occurs much more often in adults over 60.
  • Family history. If you have family members with sleep apnea, you may be at increased risk.
  • Race. In people under 35 years old, blacks are more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea.
  • Use of alcohol, sedatives or tranquilizers. These substances relax the muscles in your throat.
  • Smoking. Smokers are three times more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea than are people who’ve never smoked. Smoking may increase the amount of inflammation and fluid retention in the upper airway. This risk likely drops after you quit smoking.
  • Nasal congestion. If you have difficulty breathing through your nose — whether it’s from an anatomical problem or allergies — you’re more likely to develop obstructive sleep apnea.
  • Neck circumference. People with a thicker neck may have a narrower airway.
https://adental.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/1-30-14-girl-w-tapes-on-neck.jpg
Earn 16 CE credits and become The Sleep Dentist.
Brand yourself as a Doctor who understands, discovers, treats sleep  problems.
Read more about this.  www.TheSleepMagazine.com

 

https://adental.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/1-21-13-logo-dental-pros-sharing.jpg

See the two day course outline and register here: http://join.sleepgroupsolutions.com/seminars/louisville-ky/

George-Jones_2016

Dr. George Jones
Dr. George Jones is a native of Wheeling, WV and earned his BS in Chemistry from Wheeling Jesuit University. He received his Dental Degree from the University Of Florida College Of Dentistry, and relocated to coastal North Carolina in 2003. Over the years, Dr. Jones has served as a consultant and evaluator for several dental manufacturers and maintains a private practice in Sunset Beach, NC. .

TMD: “THE GREAT IMPOSTOR”

The TMJ- Sleep Apnea Connection

Charles Kravitz DDS
Patients have asked me,”I snore and grind my teeth at night and my jaw clicks,  Do you think I have Sleep Apnea?”

THE SYMPTOMS OF TMD AND OSA

Headaches, clicking jaw, malocclusion (misalignment of teeth), and mandibular (lower jaw) displacement are all associated with temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD). However, these symptoms often occur in patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) as well. Research in The Journal of Sleep determined in 1993 that nocturnal headaches may be caused by temporomandibular joint disorder or triggered by Sleep Disordered Breathing—“ with very similar clinical manifestations but very different therapeutic implications.”

CAUSES OF THE SYMPTOMS

The temporal muscles of the forehead play an important part in the positioning and closing of the jaw. If your occlusion (bite) is not correct, it can lead to abnormal tension in these muscles – and cause tension type headaches, toothaches, and Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD) .

TMJ    2-2-15 TMJ.cropt

TMD: “THE GREAT IMPOSTOR”

TMD is called “The Great Impostor.” The symptoms can both overlap and mimic those of Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Some dentists believe that TMD is partly the existence of a TMJ problem and partly the manifestation of a Sleep Disordered Breathing problem, such as Sleep Apnea. The simplest way to understand the connection: the bruxism (teeth grinding) or jaw shifting associated with Sleep Disordered Breathing occurs when sleeping patients are trying unconsciously to find the best possible positioning of their airway. These motions may inflame the temporomandibular joint or exacerbate a problem with the joint that was pre-existing.

CAUTION!

If you believe you have Temporomandibular Joint Disorder, I suggest you find a dentist to screen you for Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Find one who has taken dental CE courses and is trained in Dental Sleep Medicine. Don’t let “the Great Impostor” trick you into believing that your problem is solely a TMD one. It may not be.

“Oral Appliances should be fitted by qualified dental personnel who are trained and experienced in the overall care of oral health, the temporomandibular joint, dental occlusion and associated oral structures.”     – American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

 

WHAT ARE THE RISK FACTORS OF OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA?

Learn Dental Sleep Medicine in Louisville, KY on  July 22-23.

 

 3-3-13 EINSTEIN- DISCOVERY

Dr. George Jones will explain the WHY and the HOW of these Obstructive Sleep Apnea connections:

  • WHY is High Blood Pressure a symptom of SA?
  • WHY is Acid Reflux (GERD) a symptom of SA?
  • WHY is Diabetes a symptom of SA?

Learn the risk factors and HOW they contribute to OSA:

  • Excess weight. Fat deposits around your upper airway may obstruct your breathing. However, not everyone who has sleep apnea is overweight. Thin people develop OSA, too.
  • Neck circumference. People with thicker necks may have narrower airways. Women- greater than 15″ diameter and men-17″ diameter are at greater risk.
  • A narrowed airway. You may have inherited a naturally narrow throat. Or, your tonsils or adenoids may become enlarged, which can block your airway. An enlarged or inflamed uvula will block the airway.
    Being male. Men are twice as likely to have sleep apnea. However, women increase their risk if they’re overweight, and their risk also appears to rise after menopause.
  • Age. Sleep apnea occurs significantly more often in adults over 60.
  • Family history. If you have family members with sleep apnea, you may be at increased risk.
  • Race. In people under 35 years old, blacks are more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea.
  • Use of alcohol, sedatives or tranquilizers. These substances relax the muscles in your throat.
  • Smoking. Smokers are three times more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea than are people who’ve never smoked. Smoking may increase the amount of inflammation and fluid retention in the upper airway. This risk likely drops after you quit smoking.
  • Nasal congestion. If you have difficulty breathing through your nose — whether it’s from an anatomical problem or allergies — you’re more likely to develop obstructive sleep apnea.
https://adental.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/1-30-14-girl-w-tapes-on-neck.jpg
Earn 16 CE credits and become The Sleep Dentist.
Brand yourself as a Doctor who understands, discovers, treats sleep  problems.
Read more about this.  www.TheSleepMagazine.com

 

https://adental.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/1-21-13-logo-dental-pros-sharing.jpg

See the Two day course outline and register here: http://join.sleepgroupsolutions.com/seminars/louisville-ky/

http://sleepgroupsolutions.com/2.0/speakers/73/dr-george-jones

Dr. George Jones is a native of Wheeling, WV and earned his BS in Chemistry from Wheeling Jesuit University. He received his Dental Degree from the University Of Florida College Of Dentistry, and relocated to coastal North Carolina in 2003. Over the years, Dr. Jones has served as a consultant and evaluator for several dental manufacturers and maintains a private practice in Sunset Beach, NC. .