How long is it safe to keep the turkey in the fridge after the Thanksgiving dinner?

 Cooked turkey can be kept in the refrigerator 3-4 days, and in the freezer 2-3 months- for best quality.

(Look it up below.)

Another Question:  Is it OK to Put Hot Food Directly Into the Fridge?

Answer: It’s fine to place hot food directly in the refrigerator.

Don’t worry about overheating the fridge — as the U.S. Department of Agriculture points out, the refrigerator’s thermostat will keep it running to maintain a safe temperature of 40° F or below.

What you do need to worry about is whether the hot food will cool off quickly enough to reach a safe temperature once it’s in the refrigerator. So never put deep containers of hot food in the refrigerator instead, place the hot food in shallow containers so it will chill quickly.

A large pot of soup or stew, for instance, should be divided into smaller portions and placed in smaller containers before being refrigerated. A large cut of meat or whole poultry should be divided into smaller pieces and wrapped separately or placed in shallow containers before refrigerating.

Here’s a complete safety guide for thousands of foods and beverages. You can keep this on your computer desktop where you can refer to it daily.
Click on a question for the answer:


Use the Section 179 deduction to decrease your 2012 tax payments and increase cash for your other needs!

Acquire capital Dental equipment in 2012, and you are most likely able to deduct up to $500,000!   Capital leases qualify for a tax deduction for the year they are placed in service.


If you intend to purchase real property or equipment, you can take advantage of this huge saving before the end of the year.

Here’s the summary:

Section 179 allows a taxpayer to elect to deduct the cost of certain types of property on their income taxes as an expense, rather than requiring the cost of the property to be capitalized and depreciated. This property is generally limited to tangible, depreciable, personal property which is acquired by purchase for use in the active conduct of a trade or business. Buildings were not eligible for section 179 deductions prior to the passage of the Small Business Jobs Act of 2010; however, now qualified real property may be deducted.

Depreciable property that is not eligible for a section 179 deduction is still deductible over a number of years through depreciation according to sections 167 and 168. The 179 election is NOT mandatory, and the eligible property may be depreciated according to sections 167 and 168 if preferable for tax reasons. Further, the 179 election may be made only for the year the equipment is placed in use and is waived if not taken for that year.

 § 179(b)(3) provides that a taxpayer’s § 179 deduction for any taxable year may not exceed the taxpayer’s aggregate income from the active conduct of trade or business by the taxpayer for that year If, for example, the taxpayer’s net trade or business income from active conduct of trade or business was $72,500 in 2011, then the taxpayer’s § 179 deduction cannot exceed $72,500 for 2012. However, the § 179 deduction not allowed for any year because of this limitation can be carried over to the next year.

This information provides general guidance. This is not financial tax advice. Consult your tax advisor and your Dental transition Broker for individual circumstances.

Why is the poppy known as the flower for Veterans Day?

The use of the poppy as a symbol on Veterans Day is derived from its symbolism in the poem “In Flanders Fields” by John McCrae. These poppies bloomed across some of the worst battlefields of Flanders in World War I, their brilliant red colour an appropriate symbol for the blood spilt in the war.
The reason for the Poppy is that it is a plant which thrives on disturbed ground. The seeds, which are produced by the millions in the seed heads, lie dormant until the soil is broken up. The shelling in the trenches was perfect for the poppy, which grew in their millions when nothing else did. The poems came later, the poppies came from the activity and the blasting of the ground.
The enduring tradition began in WWI when John McCrae wrote this famous poem:

In Flanders Fields
“In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
In Flanders Fields.
Take up our quarrel with the foe
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders Fields.”
John McCrae 1915

Moina Michael, an American woman adopted the custom of wearing a red poppy in memory of the sacrifices of war and also as a symbol of keeping the faith.

A French woman, Madam Guerin, visiting the United States, learned of the custom and took it one step further. When she returned to France she decided to hand make the red poppies and sell them to raise money for the benefit of the orphaned and destitute women and children in war torn areas of France. This tradition spread to Canada, the United States and Australia and is still followed today.


Live web-cams from the Statue of Liberty

On October 28th, 2011, as a part of the celebration of the 125th anniversary of the dedication of the Statue of Liberty, five live web-cams were installed in Ms. Liberty’s torch, in her crown, and at the harbor. There’s also a Panorama of the NJ and NY skylines, Ellis Island, and the New York-New Jersey Harbor.

At 8:45 a.m. there was a Naturalization Ceremony, which honored the millions of U.S. immigrants who were first welcomed to America by Lady Liberty.

Click on any of the five pictures and enjoy a live streaming video… day or night.

There’s live audio too, so you can hear the whoosh of aircraft overhead and the honk of boat horns as YOU watch the ships steam across the bay. Click on this link to look and listen:

I wish I could have been there. When Lady Liberty was still in her youth, my parents saw her on their freedom voyage from Kiev, in Ukrania (then part of the Russian Empire) to Ellis Island. I can only imagine their teenage excitement and fulfillment of hope when they saw Lady Liberty from their ship. They were so proud and determined to become Americans- in every way. They quickly learned to speak English and adapted to every American way of life. I am very proud of them.
The one time I saw The Statue of Liberty was from a US Army troop ship returning to the Port of New York on a foggy morning. The scene is emblazoned in my memory.
On Sunday, 11/11/12 let’s remember the Veterans of our struggles for Liberty who never returned to see this beautiful tribute.