DON’T LOSE THAT PATIENT!

. DON’T LOSE THAT PATIENT!

SUCCESS is in the follow-thru.  What do YOU do?

A first-time patient may have been very impressed with the warmth and consideration shown by the Dentist and the dental team. The patient seemed eager to get started and the next appointment was made. A Treatment Plan was prepared, to be presented, or to begin. A week has passed and the patient has just called to cancel or, even worse…… does not show for the appointment. What went wrong?

In almost all cases, the disjunction was caused by a lack of COMMUNICATION.

Here are few ideas to keep our patient engaged between visits by follow-thru. Please add your great ideas to the list. The objective is to build a lifelong relationship with your patient.

1. A New Patient Welcome package after their first call to let them know how pleased you are that they chose you.
2. A friendly Confirmation Call-  a given!
3. A visit-ending “debriefing”, recapping what was done today and the importance of the next visit. Stress the “clinical concerns”. Do this after every visit,
4. A letter or e-mail .telling them how you enjoyed meeting them and welcoming them into your family of patients.
5. Ask for permission to send them monthly e-newsletters with timely, interesting and fun-packed health-oriented information.

Make the right pitch and follow-thru. To a baseball pitcher, the trajectory of your arm, after the release of the ball, is a critical component to get the ball to a predictable location.

These are a few ideas for a start. What do YOU do, between visits, to maintain and grow that relationship, and make your patient look forward to that next appointment?

www.advancedentalconsulting.com

1 hour ago

YOU CAN PRESENT PATIENT-ORIENTED SEMINARS IN YOUR OFFICE

 Are you looking for a way to stand out in your community? Here is how you can gain respect as a Leader, generate New Patient leads, and provide a great public service.

 Select a topic that will draw an audience.The “hottest” topic today is Sleep Apnea. Just google into the internet and you will see the widespread interest in SA. People are becoming very aware of the dangers caused by the stoppage of breathing while they are asleep. They are looking for answers and very few Dentists are prepared. Take a training course or a seminar, become knowledgeable in the signs and symptoms, the risk factors,and in the various treatment options. Sharpen your expertise.
 
Here’s what you do:
 Present a free seminar in your Reception Room. Select a date at least one month out so you and your invitees will be able to get it into your schedules.
 
How to Announce and Promote it:
  • Have a “sign-up sheet in your office
  • Send out email announcements to patients of record; ask them to assure their place by return email.
  • Let each invitee know that they may invite two friends or relatives.
  • Place a large colorful poster in your Reception Room.
  • Distribute flyers to local businesses and professional offices.
  • Place a small display ad in your local newspaper.
 Some Tips for the Seminar
  • Present it in the largest room in your office- usually the Reception Roo
  • Prevent any interruptions – turn off phone ringers, etc.
  • Have a “Welcome Table” with some juices and other beverages (sugarless, of course).
  • Have your flyers, brochures, and business cards on the “Welcome Table”.
  • Prepare a power point presentation with video.
  • Subjects like Sleep Apnea are serious, but to keep the audience entertained, infuse some humor.
  • Encourage interactive participation. Invite questions from the audience.
  • Prepare some hand-outs for the participants to take home.
These are just a few ideas. I am sure you will think of a lot more.
 
Objectives and Outcomes
 You will be respected as a Leader and Educator.
You will generate New Patient leads.
You will provide a needed and valuable public service.
 

ADHD, TONSILS, and OSA in Children

ADHD is linked with a variety of sleep problems. For example, one recent study found that children with ADHD had higher rates of daytime sleepiness than children without ADHD. Another study found that 50% of children with ADHD had signs of sleep disordered breathing, compared to only 22% of children without ADHD. Research also suggests that restless legs syndrome and periodic leg movement syndrome are also common in children with ADHD.

Sometimes apnea can affect school performance. One recent study suggests that some kids diagnosed with ADHD actually have attention problems in school because of disrupted sleep patterns caused by obstructive sleep apnea.

A common type of apnea in children, obstructive apnea (OSA), is caused by an obstruction of the airway (such as enlarged tonsils and adenoids). This is most likely to happen during sleep because that’s when the soft tissue at back of the throat is most relaxed. As many as 1% to 3% of otherwise healthy preschool-age kids have obstructive apnea.

Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a term used to describe hyperactivity, inattentiveness, and/or impulsivity. It is a common condition that begins in childhood and may persist into adulthood. Children with ADHD typically have trouble sitting still, staying focused, and/or controlling their behavior and emotions, which can lead to lower social skills, isolation, dependence, and poor performance in school. For this reason, children with ADHD often require special attention from parents, teachers, school systems and healthcare and mental health professionals in order to succeed.

In general, sleep deprivation is a problem among children in America. According to NSF’s Sleep in America poll, more than two-thirds of children experience one or more sleep problems at least a few nights a week. For children with ADHD, poor sleep (too little sleep or symptoms of sleep disorders) may profoundly impact ADHD symptoms. In fact, one study found that treating sleep problems may be enough to eliminate attention and hyperactivity issues for some children.

If You Think Your Child Has Apnea

If you suspect that your child has apnea, call your doctor. Search for a physician who is trained and certified in the diagnosis and treatment of Sleep Apnea. Although prolonged pauses in breathing can be serious, after a doctor does a complete evaluation and makes a diagnosis, most cases of apnea can be treated or managed.

Excerpted from these Sources:

National Sleep Foundation

Mayo Clinic

WebMD

Kids Health